Oklahoma City Women's Regional: Louisville's upset of Baylor caught the attention of plenty of people

It's happened before. Even in the women's game. The giant fell. But hardly anybody paid attention — before now.
by Stephanie Kuzydym Published: April 1, 2013
Advertisement
;

photo - Louisville's Antonita Slaughter (4) celebrates a three-point shot during college basketball game between Baylor University and Louisville at the Oklahoma City Regional for the NCAA women's college basketball tournament at Chesapeake Energy Arena in Oklahoma City, Sunday, March 31, 2013. Photo by Sarah Phipps, The Oklahoman
Louisville's Antonita Slaughter (4) celebrates a three-point shot during college basketball game between Baylor University and Louisville at the Oklahoma City Regional for the NCAA women's college basketball tournament at Chesapeake Energy Arena in Oklahoma City, Sunday, March 31, 2013. Photo by Sarah Phipps, The Oklahoman

It's happened before. Even in the women's game.

The giant fell.

But hardly anybody paid attention — before now.

Sunday night, the world paid attention when No. 5 Louisville upset No. 1 Baylor. It might not seem like a big upset because it wasn't a No. 15 over a No. 2, but upsets rarely happen in the women's tournament — and Baylor rarely loses — at least since Brittney Griner's been in green. That combination is what made the world turn to Oklahoma City.

As Baylor's Brittney Griner, arguably the greatest player to ever be a part of the women's game, knelt to the floor and hid her head in her jersey, much of the world, based on TV ratings and Twitter analysis, was watching. It was like all of a sudden the nation cared about women's basketball — all it took was for the game's biggest giant of them all to fall.

“That's why you play the game,” Tennessee coach Holly Warlick said. “It's a game, and all bets are off. “

On average, the topic of “Baylor” was tweeted about between 1,801 to 3,084 times per day last week per searches on Topsy, a website and company that analyzes billions of tweets and Web pages. On Sunday at 8:47 p.m., when the loss was complete and Baylor coach Kim Mulkey had just ended her press conference, Topsy's trend data reflects that 33,607 tweets were sent out about Baylor. That was the peak of tweets that started with 2,507 mentions about two hours before during the game.

“Nobody in the world thought we'd even come close to beating them,” Louisville's senior forward Monique Reid said Monday.

Yet many in the world had something to say. Tweets came from as far away as Lagos, Nigeria and London, England.

“Only time I follow women's basketball is to make sure UConn wins and Baylor loses” said a Twitter user from the U.K..

He wasn't the only one.

Louisville coach Jeff Walz said Saturday in a press conference that some of his friends never watch the NCAA Women's Tournament because it's always the same teams that make the Final Four.

“I did get a few to actually say they watched it from start to finish, which was great,” Walz said Monday with a smile. “I've got some friends that I played college ball with where they were like, ‘I just actually watched the entire game and enjoyed it,' and I text them back, ‘There's a lot more that are like this than you think.'

Continue reading this story on the...

by Stephanie Kuzydym
Reporter
Stephanie Kuzydym learned at a young age that life is a game of inches. That's just one reason why she loves football. Kuzydym joined The Oklahoman in July 2012. Before arriving in the state, Kuzydym was an intern for the sports departments at...
+ show more


Trending Now


AROUND THE WEB

  1. 1
    CDC: U.S. has first confirmed case of Ebola in Dallas
  2. 2
    Netflix to shake up movies with 'Crouching Tiger 2'
  3. 3
    Donald Trump Tricked Into Retweeting Serial Killer Pic
  4. 4
    'Transparent' on Amazon Prime, reviewed: It’s the fall’s best new show.
  5. 5
    Brits Unwittingly Give Up Firstborns for Free WiFi
+ show more