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Oklahoma conference demonstrates cutting-edge technology in oil and gas industry

by Adam Wilmoth Modified: August 15, 2013 at 10:00 pm •  Published: August 14, 2013
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— Improved drilling technology has been credited with fueling the country's ongoing oil and natural gas boom, but innovation in later steps of the production process continue to develop in an effort that has improved speed, safety and profitability throughout the industry.

Much of the updated technology has focused on improving safety and reducing environmental risk, said David Guest, owner of Edmond-based Guest Petroleum Inc.

“The most important process is safety,” Guest said Wednesday at the Mid-Continent Digital Oilfield Conference in Tulsa. “Having the new tools makes monitoring, reporting and ensuring safety that much more effective and more precise.”

The conference was designed to demonstrate what new technologies are available, and to help especially small and mid-size oil and gas companies embrace the new offerings, said Mindy Stitt, executive director of the Oklahoma Energy Resources Board, which sponsored the event.

“They know the technology is out there, and they want to learn more about it,” Stitt said.

The conference focused on various technology applications such as storage tanks that automatically move valves or shut in wells when sensors detect they are too full, equipment that closes natural gas lines if a pilot light is snuffed out and monitors that notify operators if there is a problem with a well or other oil and natural gas equipment.

Shawn Cutter, CEO of Tampa, Fla.-based Fielding Systems, used a smartphone to illustrate the need for updated technology.

“If you want to know how much information gathering has changed, ask a fourth grader what is the deepest point in the ocean,” he said. “It will take longer to type in the question than it will for that fourth grader to find the answer.

“The expectation now is for information to be available at any time, wherever we are.”

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by Adam Wilmoth
Energy Editor
Adam Wilmoth returned to The Oklahoman as energy editor in 2012 after working for four years in public relations. He previously spent seven years as a business reporter at The Oklahoman, including five years covering the state's energy sector....
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