Oklahoma could benefit from free-market approach to state parks

by The Oklahoman Editorial Board Published: June 22, 2012
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DUE to budget challenges, California officials plan to privatize six state parks this July. That's a small fraction of the 278 parks in the Golden State, but it represents a significant philosophical change — one that should give local policymakers reason to rethink Oklahoma's approach to park management.

Oklahoma has 35 state parks, down from 42. In 2011, the Oklahoma Department of Tourism and Recreation announced plans to close or transfer operation of seven parks that were, on average, only 34 percent self-sufficient. Based on reaction at the time, you would have thought the tourism department was eliminating the entire park system.

That outcry proved unwarranted as all seven of the parks were taken over by local governments, including some American Indian tribes. Today, those visiting the parks likely can't tell the difference and the state saved around $500,000 annually. That's a half-million dollars that can now be used for teacher salaries, bridge repair, public safety or other important needs.

California's example shows the state could take things a step further by privatizing park operations. The Oklahoma Council of Public Affairs, a conservative think tank, has recommended that the state follow the lead of the U.S. Forestry Service and lease operation of state parks, as well as institute park entrance fees. The OCPA estimates $1.4 million could be saved annually.

Former Gov. Brad Henry, a Democrat, endorsed similar changes in his fiscal year 2006 budget. Henry's plan called for leasing five state golf courses to private management and development.

In Oklahoma, public parks and golf courses are often subpar, and sometimes worse. Privatization of operations could result in improved amenities without draining limited tax dollars away from schools, roads or law enforcement.

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by The Oklahoman Editorial Board
The Oklahoman Editorial Board consists of Gary Pierson, President and CEO of The Oklahoma Publishing Company; Christopher P. Reen, president and publisher of The Oklahoman; Kelly Dyer Fry, editor and vice president of news; Christy Gaylord...
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