Oklahoma Department of Human Services meets goal to eliminate shelter use for babies

The Oklahoma Department of Human Services has achieved its first major reform goal of the new year by eliminating the use of state shelters for overnight stays of nearly all abused and neglected children under age 2, officials announced Wednesday.
by Randy Ellis Modified: January 8, 2013 at 9:16 am •  Published: January 2, 2013

The Oklahoma Department of Human Services has achieved its first major reform goal of the new year by eliminating the use of state shelters for overnight stays of nearly all abused and neglected children under age 2, officials announced Wednesday.

However, shelter overcrowding remains a problem for older children in state custody, records reveal.

Despite dramatic reductions in babies at state shelters, the number of children staying overnight at the state's shelters in Oklahoma City and Tulsa actually increased from an average of 116 in November 2011 to 123 in November 2012.

Records show the Laura Dester Children's Shelter in Tulsa had an average daily population of 70 in November 2012 — seven above its licensed capacity. The Pauline E. Mayer Children's Shelter in Oklahoma City had an average daily population of 53 in November 2012 — five above its licensed capacity.

December data was not yet available from the agency.

Sheree Powell, spokeswoman for DHS, said the Laura Dester shelter is relatively new and capable of safely housing children above its licensed capacity.

When the Pauline E. Mayer shelter approaches capacity, DHS has an agreement with regulators that allows it to move some children to an annex building or two other facilities, Powell said. DHS hasn't had to move children to avoid capacity problems in Oklahoma City since shortly before Thanksgiving, she said.

DHS remains out of compliance with a 2009 state law that directed the agency to dramatically reduce the populations of its Oklahoma City and Tulsa shelters to no more than 25 each.

“It's still a struggle changing the way we do business,” Powell said. “We are going to take it a step at a time and a goal at a time, but we will get there.”

More foster parents are needed, she said.

Reducing or eliminating the use of state shelters for all age groups — but especially infants and toddlers — is one of the cornerstones of a DHS reform plan called the Pinnacle Plan. The goal is to quickly place those children in foster homes or other family-like settings.

State officials agreed to the plan as part of a settlement to a class-action lawsuit regarding the treatment of children in state custody.

Deborah Smith, director of DHS Child Welfare Services, expressed excitement about achieving the first milestone.

“This was a very important goal for our state to achieve not only for the Pinnacle Plan — it's the right thing to do for young children,” Smith said. “OKDHS cannot do this work alone and we would like to thank all Oklahomans who have stepped up recently to become foster parents. We would also like to thank all of our private partners and the faith community for helping recruit, train and support foster families.”


by Randy Ellis
Capitol Bureau Reporter
For the past 30 years, staff writer Randy Ellis has exposed public corruption and government mismanagement in news articles. Ellis has investigated problems in Oklahoma's higher education institutions and wrote stories that ultimately led to two...
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