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Oklahoma football: Hudl allowing Sooners to study more quickly, effectively

OU FOOTBALL — The Oklahoma football team is now able to break down film via their tablets or cell phones instead of using DVDs. Game and practice film is uploaded and accessed by players and coaches via the internet.
BY STEPHANIE KUZYDYM, Staff Writer, skuzydym@opubco.com Published: December 26, 2012


photo - Oklahoma's Landry Jones (12) throws the ball during the college football game between the University of Oklahoma Sooners (OU) and Florida A&M Rattlers at Gaylord Family-Oklahoma Memorial Stadium in Norman, Okla., Saturday, Sept. 8, 2012. Photo by Bryan Terry, The Oklahoman
Oklahoma's Landry Jones (12) throws the ball during the college football game between the University of Oklahoma Sooners (OU) and Florida A&M Rattlers at Gaylord Family-Oklahoma Memorial Stadium in Norman, Okla., Saturday, Sept. 8, 2012. Photo by Bryan Terry, The Oklahoman

“It's changed everything,” Stoop said. “I had four or five games on each side of the ball loaded into my iPad. I had a three-and-a-half hour flight to San Francisco, and I studied them the whole way.

“I went through two and three games and really analyzed it. You have a pen with you and you make all your points in your notes and you can do your work anywhere. It's really changed.”

The application, Martin said, was developed by a couple graduates from the University of Nebraska and is used at the high school level as well.

Hudl even helps OU from the recruiting aspect. Instead of looking through stacks of DVDs, if a potential recruit's film is uploaded to Hudl, Stoops or assistant coaches can search for the kid and pull up their highlight film.

Oklahoma isn't the only big-time program using Hudl. Nebraska, Oregon and Kansas State also use the application.

This same playbook and game film study is happening at the professional level. An application called PlayerLync — used by the Denver Broncos, Green Bay Packers, Chicago Bears, Cincinnati Bengals and San Diego Chargers — is used in the NFL by five teams, according to a recent report from ESPN. It's cut out the printing of 500-page playbooks and “revolutionized the way they push out film and significantly altered the way they communicate.”

"It changes the way you prepare," Broncos tight end Jacob Tamme told ESPN. "You can come off the practice field, get in the cold tub and watch film in the cold tub on your iPad."

For Stoops, it's used as soon as he comes off the field.

“As soon as I get on the bus after the game, I'm already watching the tape and what went right, what went wrong,” Stoops said. “I've already gone through it by the time we land.

“It just allows you a lot quicker access.”