Oklahoma football: Why J.D. Runnels takes pride in the Sooners' sustained fullback success

by Jason Kersey Modified: April 26, 2014 at 4:53 pm •  Published: April 26, 2014


photo - Cincinnati Bengals running back J.D. Runnels Jr. catches a  pass at their NFL football training camp , Thursday, Aug. 6, 2009, in Georgetown, Ky. (AP Photo/Al Behrman)
Cincinnati Bengals running back J.D. Runnels Jr. catches a pass at their NFL football training camp , Thursday, Aug. 6, 2009, in Georgetown, Ky. (AP Photo/Al Behrman)

— When J.D. Runnels watches fullbacks continue to have a major role in Oklahoma’s offense year after year, he swells with pride.

But not necessarily for the reason you might think.

“To the common fan, they would think just because of the brotherhood-type deal,” Runnels said. “But what a lot of people don’t know is that my freshman year, we almost did away with a fullback.”

In 2002, when Runnels was a new Sooner, fresh off his All-State high school career at Carl Albert, the Sooners didn't quite feel the need for a fullback in their offense. Seth Littrell had graduated after the 2000 national championship, and running back Quentin Griffin was better out of single-back sets.

Eventually that season, though, Runnels began making an impact, then helped pave the way for a long list of important Bob Stoops-era fullbacks like Matt Clapp, Brody Eldridge, Trey Millard, Aaron Ripkowski and, now, Dimitri Flowers.

“Just knowing that it was almost extinct, and now looking back 10 years and we've had four or five All-Big 12 guys, that’s what makes me proud,” Runnels said. “And we’re probably gonna have another one with Dimitri.”

Oklahoma’s offensive schemes have changed throughout the 15-year Stoops era, but one thing has mostly remained consistent: The use of a versatile, tough fullback.

Flowers, a true freshman from San Antonio who enrolled early this spring, has drawn lots of comparisons to Millard and lived up to that with a strong spring game performance. He started the game and caught four passes for 40 yards.

How exactly do Stoops and his staff keep finding these guys?

“We’re really aware when we see very good football players,” Stoops said. “They may not have all the stars, or may not fit any one particular position but we love the way they play.


by Jason Kersey
OU Sports Reporter
Jason Kersey became The Oklahoman's OU football beat writer in May 2012 after a year covering high school sports and OSU recruiting. Before joining the newspaper in November 2006 as a part-time results clerk, he covered high school football for...
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