Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin continues support for wind production tax credit

by Paul Monies Published: September 25, 2012
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Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin remains committed to an extension of the federal production tax credit for wind energy, joining several other Republican governors and lawmakers in the central United States and highlighting a split with GOP presidential nominee Mitt Romney.

Fallin, speaking at the annual meeting of the Southern States Energy Board in Oklahoma City, said she still supports a temporary extension of the production tax credit. The incentive, which expires Dec. 31, offers wind producers a 2.2 cent per kilowatt-hour tax credit.

Fallin sent a letter to congressional leaders in February supporting a renewal of the wind production tax credit. This summer, Romney's campaign said the former Massachusetts governor did not support an extension of the credit. His energy plan doesn't mention the incentive but does say government shouldn't pick winners in the marketplace.

“I agree with Governor Romney on 99 percent of the issues,” Fallin said Monday in an interview with The Oklahoman. “But on this one, I've got to do what's best for our state.”

Fallin said the wind industry supports more than 3,000 jobs in Oklahoma. The state ranks in the top 10 nationally for wind capacity and electricity generation from wind. Republican governors in other wind-producing states such as Iowa and Kansas also support an extension of the credit.

The wind sector continues to shed jobs as uncertainty remains over the production tax credit. A study for the American Wind Energy Association predicts up to 37,000 jobs could be at risk if the credit expires. Tulsa's DMI Industries, which makes wind towers, last month announced the layoff of more than 165 people as its parent company decided to exit the wind sector.

In an afternoon panel, Michael Skelly, president of Clean Line Energy Partners, said improvements in wind turbines and blade materials have lowered the cost of wind energy. He cited a recent report by the Lazard investment bank that put the cost of wind with a production tax credit in the 3 cents per kilowatt-hour range. That compares to about 5 cents without the tax credit. New construction for coal and natural gas generators were 7 and 8 cents per kilowatt hour, Skelly said.

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by Paul Monies
Energy Reporter
Paul Monies is an energy reporter for The Oklahoman. He has worked at newspapers in Texas and Missouri and most recently was a data journalist for USA Today in the Washington D.C. area. Monies also spent nine years as a business reporter and...
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