Oklahoma lawmakers won't get raises, board decides

Pay for Oklahoma legislators will remain the same as it's been the past 13 years, Legislative Compensation Board decides. Board members said a pay hike couldn't be justified with so many Oklahomans struggling financially as the state attempts to recover from the national recession.
BY MICHAEL MCNUTT mmcnutt@opubco.com Published: October 19, 2011
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Granting an increase in pay or benefits for state lawmakers would send the wrong message to taxpayers, the chairman of the Legislative Compensation Board said Tuesday.

The board voted 7-0 Tuesday to keep legislative pay at the same level it's been the past 13 years.

Board members said a pay hike couldn't be justified with so many Oklahomans struggling financially as the state attempts to recover from the national recession.

“It was the wrong signal,” board Chairman Nick Williams said. “We live in an economic climate where businesses are going bankrupt, people are losing their jobs. ... It would send a horrible message.”

“This is a tough economy,” board member Bernard Jones said. “Constituents aren't receiving raises.

“I'm not even sure the state could afford it,” he said.

Legislators are paid $38,400 a year. Oklahoma legislators are the 16th-highest paid, according to the National Conference of State Legislatures. California is the highest, with an annual salary of $95,291.

Oklahoma ranks first in pay in the region that consists of Texas, New Mexico, Colorado, Kansas, Missouri and Arkansas, according to the National Conference of State Legislatures.

Oklahoma legislators are in session from early February through late May. Williams, new-car sales manager for Mercedes-Benz of Oklahoma City, said they're in session mostly Monday through Thursday and actually work 65 legislative days.

The board, which consists of members appointed by the governor and legislative leaders, last approved a pay increase for legislators in 1997. The 20 percent raise, which increased the annual salary for lawmakers from $32,000, took effect after the November 1998 general election.

“I don't feel sorry for those guys who make $38,400,” Williams said. “It was their decision to be a public servant.”

Legislative leaders are paid extra. The speaker and president pro tempore are paid $56,332; floor leaders and budget committee chairmen are paid $50,764.

House Speaker Kris Steele, R-Shawnee, had asked his two appointees to the nine-member board to not approve a compensation increase for legislators because of economic conditions. Both voted for keeping the salary the same.

“The board made the right decision,” Steele said. “Clearly they are in tune with the fiscal reality faced by Oklahoma, and I commend them for keeping the taxpayers' best interest in mind with their decision.”

The Board of Judicial Compensation voted last month to increase judges' pay by 6 percent, which would cost an additional $1.86 million in salaries alone. The salaries of the 11 statewide elected officials, along with the state's 27 district attorneys, also would go up 6 percent because they are tied to the judicial salaries. The salaries of district judges in Oklahoma rank 35th in the country and the state Supreme Court justices rank 32nd. The raises will take effect July 1 if the governor or the Legislature doesn't reject them.