Oklahoma lawsuit reform bills pass initial hurdles

With about two dozen doctors in white lab coats peering down from legislative galleries, Oklahoma lawmakers Thursday passed a series of bills aimed at deterring frivolous lawsuits and resolving constitutional issues raised by the Oklahoma Supreme Court.
by Randy Ellis Published: September 6, 2013
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With about two dozen doctors in white lab coats peering down from legislative galleries, state lawmakers Thursday passed a series of bills aimed at deterring frivolous lawsuits and resolving constitutional issues raised by the Oklahoma Supreme Court.

All of the 12 Senate bills and 12 House bills taken up Thursday passed overwhelmingly. Many votes were unanimous. But there was spirited debate over a Senate bill that would require an individual to first obtain a certificate of merit from a qualified expert before being allowed to proceed with any negligence lawsuit in which an expert witness is required. That bill eventually passed by a vote of 33-11.

Senate Minority Leader Sean Burrage, D-Claremore, led the opposition.

“I fully expect this bill will be found unconstitutional,” Burrage said, arguing the proposed law would prevent citizens with legitimate grievances from gaining access to the courts.

“Why would we vote again to essentially send the Supreme Court another piece of unconstitutional legislation?” Burrage asked. “Doesn't that make us look a bit strange or even incompetent? Aren't we tired of being scolded by the court for passing unconstitutional legislation?”

The Oklahoma Supreme Court last June struck down a 2009 lawsuit reform law, ruling that it improperly focused on more than one topic.

Justices found additional problems with the certificate of merit requirement, ruling that it was unconstitutional because it was a special law pertaining only to professional negligence cases. Justices also ruled that requiring a certificate of merit was an unconstitutional financial barrier to court access because such expert opinions can cost thousands of dollars. The law contained a provision allowing poor people to obtain a waiver to the certificate requirement by paying a $40 fee to file for an indigency exception, but justices found that was also an improper financial barrier to court access.

Anthony Sykes, one of the Senate authors of the new certificate of merit bill, said lawmakers believe they appropriately addressed the court's concerns in the new bill.

The new bill requires certificates of merit to be obtained in all types of negligence cases where expert witness testimony is required, not just professional negligence cases, said Sykes, R-Oklahoma City. The bill does away with the $40 filing fee for indigency exceptions but still allows indigent people to get the certificate of merit requirement waived.

“I'd say we're being responsive to the court,” Sykes said. “I'd also say I think the court has really gone off the deep end.”

Burrage argued the new bill creates even bigger problems than the old one concerning citizens' access to the courts.

The original law was designed to deter frivolous medical malpractice lawsuits. Burrage said in those cases victims of malpractice at least are entitled to their own medical records, which gives them evidence upon which an expert witness can base a negligence opinion for a certificate of merit.

In many other types of lawsuits, attorneys can't even get access to documents proving negligence until after they file the lawsuit and obtain access to records through the legal discovery process, he said. Burrage said victims in those types of cases would be denied the ability to pursue legitimate lawsuits if the bill becomes law.

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by Randy Ellis
Capitol Bureau Reporter
For the past 30 years, staff writer Randy Ellis has exposed public corruption and government mismanagement in news articles. Ellis has investigated problems in Oklahoma's higher education institutions and wrote stories that ultimately led to two...
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