Oklahoma makes strides in degree completion, but has more work to do, report says

Although the state has made strides in its efforts to boost the number of residents with college degrees, Oklahoma still has a long way to go, according to a new report. Oklahoma ranks 42nd in the nation in terms of degree completion, according to the report.
by Silas Allen Modified: June 17, 2013 at 9:04 pm •  Published: June 18, 2013
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Although the state has made strides in its efforts to boost the number of residents with college degrees, Oklahoma still has a long way to go, according to a new report.

The nonprofit Lumina Foundation released its report “A Stronger Nation Through Higher Education” last week. Oklahoma ranks 42nd in the nation in terms of degree completion, according to the report

According to the report, 33 percent of Oklahoma adults ages 25-64 held a college degree in 2011, the most recent year for which data were available.

Although that figure places Oklahoma behind the national average, it was an improvement over 2009, when 31.7 percent of Oklahoma adults held a college degree.

The group hopes to see 60 percent of Americans hold postsecondary degrees, certifications or other credentials by 2025, and estimates that 57 percent of all Oklahoma jobs will require some form of education beyond high school by 2018.

The study is based in data from 2011, the same year that higher education officials launched Oklahoma's Complete College America campaign, a 12-year initiative that seeks to boost the number of college degrees and professional certificates Oklahoma awards each year.

Since then, higher education officials have seen success in ramping up the number of degrees the state awards. Together, Oklahoma's public and private colleges and universities awarded nearly 3,000 more degrees last year than the previous year, topping the state's annual goal of awarding 1,700 more degrees and vocational certificates.

During a meeting last month, Oklahoma higher education Chancellor Glen Johnson told the Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education that higher education officials are committed to continuing that trend over the next decade. Johnson acknowledged that the 1,700-degree target would likely be more difficult to reach as the campaign progresses.

A key way Oklahoma could make progress in its degree completion efforts is by recruiting older students who have some college credit but haven't completed their degrees, said Dewayne Matthews, the Lumina Foundation's vice president of policy and strategy.


by Silas Allen
General Assignment/Breaking News Reporter
Silas Allen is a news reporter for The Oklahoman. He is a Missouri native and a 2008 graduate of the University of Missouri.
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