Oklahoma man's quest to return from Middle East gets online petition support

An online petition has been launched to help gain public support for a Muslim man and Oklahoma native who has been prevented from returning to the United States.
BY CARLA HINTON chinton@opubco.com Published: November 17, 2012
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An online petition drive launched on behalf of a Muslim man from Oklahoma has garnered more than 6,000 signatures of people asking the U.S. government to take the man off its “no-fly” list.

Saddiq Long, a McAlester native, has been teaching English in the Middle East since 2000.

The U.S. Air Force veteran's attempts to board a plane to America have been thwarted twice since April, but he said no one has told him why.

Long is seeking to return to McAlester to see his terminally ill mother, who lives there.

Friday, Adam Soltani, executive director of the Oklahoma chapter of the Council on American-Islamic Relations, said his organization helped Long's sister, A.L. Anderson, create the online petition in an effort to get Long back to America.

Soltani said Long, 43, has booked a flight leaving Qatar on Monday, and his sister is hoping the online petition will help sway the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and the FBI to allow him to board the plane bound for America.

“We're hoping the public support shown through the petition will affect hearts there,” Soltani said.

Anderson, who lives in Oklahoma City, shared her thoughts in a news release posted on Change.org.

“My brother has no criminal record and there is no reason for him to be barred from flying home,” she said in the statement. “This is a violation of his civil liberties.”

An FBI spokesman in Oklahoma City recently said he could not confirm or deny whether Long is on a government “no-fly” list.



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