Oklahoma official says American Indian culture should be taught

American Indian culture should be taught on a regular basis in Oklahoma classrooms, state schools Superintendent Janet Barresi told a group of tribal educators and officials meeting Monday in Norman.
By The Associated Press Published: May 3, 2011
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— American Indian culture should be taught on a regular basis in Oklahoma classrooms, state schools Superintendent Janet Barresi told a group of tribal educators and officials.

Speaking Monday during a symposium on American Indian education organized by the University of Oklahoma's Native American Studies Program, Barresi said she plans to expand the duties of the director of Native American education at the state Department of Education and wants tribal input on who should be hired to fill that position.

“We will be looking for ways that we can develop strategies in this state to effectively education Native American children, no matter where they are in their schools,” Barresi said. “We want to work with councils, with each of you, to look at ways that we can infuse the rich culture of our Native American heritage within curriculum, across curricula, and ways we can infuse that within what is taught within our classrooms.

“Oklahoma has a proud culture, and I want the rest of the nation and the world to understand that. How better to show that than when Oklahoma's children begin to appreciate and understand that.”

She later told The Associated Press she wants Oklahoma tribes to offer suggestions on how to teach Indian culture in the classroom. She said Indian culture could be incorporated in subjects including reading, social studies and science “in all grades.”

“It is a part of what we are,” she said. “Just as it's important to teach U.S. history within our schools and have students understand our current form of government … it's also important for Oklahoma kids to understand the culture that made Oklahoma what it is, made it great.”

Comments resonate

Barresi's comments seemed to resonate with most who attended the conference, which focused on issues including tribal government involvement in public education and policy issues affecting the education of American Indians.

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