Oklahoma regulators consider new rules for wastewater disposal wells

The Oklahoma Corporation Commission is considering new rules for operators of wastewater disposal wells.
by Jay F. Marks Published: January 17, 2014
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Austin Holland, a research seismologist with the U.S. Geological Survey, said the proposed rule change makes sense.

“The additional monitoring for wells in the Arbuckle will provide a more consistent measure for the commonly reported monthly values and, in addition, will also allow regulators and researchers more tools to examine possible cases of induced seismicity when they may occur,” Holland said.

“As a researcher, more data is always better, and this is no exception.”

SandRidge Energy Inc. CEO James Bennett said he is supportive of the proposed rule change. The company operates more than 130 disposal wells in the Mississippian formation, which includes parts of northern Oklahoma and southern Kansas.

“The nature of our business provides unique geological access and insights, and SandRidge is committed to supporting industry partners like the Oklahoma Corporation Commission in gathering data that furthers understanding and knowledge of seismic activity,” he said.

The proposed rule changes will be discussed in two upcoming technical conferences, which are set for Jan. 29 and Feb. 14.

Feedback at those conferences will determine what proposals will be passed along for the consideration of the three elected commissioners. Any new rules also must be approved by the state legislature.

Contributing:

Adam Wilmoth, Energy Editor

by Jay F. Marks
Energy Reporter
Jay F. Marks has been covering Oklahoma news since graduating from Oklahoma State University in 1996. He worked in Sulphur and Enid before joining The Oklahoman in 2005. Marks has been covering the energy industry since 2009.
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