Oklahoma Rep. James Lankford criticizes administration after emails emerge about Libya attack

Rep. Lankford says newly released emails suggest senior officials misled the public about the attack, but the administration says emails did not have verified information and facts are still being gathered.
by Chris Casteel Published: October 25, 2012
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— Rep. James Lankford criticized the Obama administration again Wednesday over its public statements shortly after the Sept. 11 attack on the U.S. consulate in Libya, suggesting senior officials deliberately told misleading stories.

Lankford, R-Oklahoma City, said recently released emails show the administration knew the night of the attack that a militant Libyan group claimed credit on Facebook for killing a U.S. ambassador and three other American diplomats.

“We keep getting more evidence that senior officials in the State Department and White House had access to the real-time facts on the ground and yet reported several different stories to the American people,” Lankford said in a statement.

“Which senior official was in charge of telling the American people the truth? It is now apparent that the first report of a terrorist attack in Benghazi was later changed by someone before it was reported to the American people.”

Days after the attack, White House press secretary Jay Carney and Ambassador Susan Rice were still suggesting the attack that killed Ambassador Chris Stevens and three others resulted from a protest over an anti-Islam video, Lankford said.

“In times of crisis, we need clarity from our senior officials and the White House, not speculation and misstatements,” Lankford said.

Carney told reporters on Wednesday that the email referenced by Lankford was “an open-source, unclassified email about a posting on a Facebook site. I would also note, I think that within a few hours, that organization itself claimed that it had not been responsible. Neither should be taken as fact. That's why there's an investigation under way.”


by Chris Casteel
Washington Bureau
Chris Casteel began working for The Oklahoman's Norman bureau in 1982 while a student at the University of Oklahoma. After covering the police beat, federal courts and the state Legislature in Oklahoma City, he moved to Washington in 1990, where...
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