Oklahoma schools Superintendent Barresi worries there's not enough time to develop academic standards to replace Common Core

The State schools superintendent will ask the Board of Education to approve a framework for developing benchmarks.
by Tim Willert Modified: July 18, 2014 at 5:00 pm •  Published: July 17, 2014
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Janet Barresi discusses the effort to make new standards replacing Common Core at a state Education Department conference Thursday. Photo by David McDaniel, The Oklahoman
Janet Barresi discusses the effort to make new standards replacing Common Core at a state Education Department conference Thursday. Photo by David McDaniel, The Oklahoman

State schools Superintendent Janet Barresi said Thursday two years might not be enough time to develop rigorous new academic standards for math and English.

“It sounds like it’s a long time,” Barresi said. “We’re really worried we may not have enough time.”

The state Education Department has outlined a two-year plan to develop standards to replace the Common Core standards repealed by the Oklahoma legislature.

“If you’re going to do these well ... if you’re going to do your research ... it’s going to take time,” she said. “I think we can get it all done, but we have to jump into it. We’ve got to get going right away.”

Barresi will ask the state Board of Education on Wednesday to approve the framework for developing the standards.

That structure will include a steering committee composed of several state government education officials that will appoint four executive committees of up to 21 members apiece.

The executive committee will include everyone from parents to tribal leaders to business leaders. Then, 28 standards creation teams, mostly composed of teachers, will draft new standards with input from executive committees.

“We’re going to take a lot of standards from a lot of states,” Barresi said. “I don’t know, the committees may decide they want standards from foreign countries, as well.

“I’ve had some people tell me they want to see Singapore math and they want to see standards from Finland.”

Draft review committees, which can include Oklahomans from all walks of life, will examine standards. Throughout the process, 12 regional advisory committees will gather community input. Later, an assessment design committee will review standards content, alignment from grade to grade, and assessment design and structure.

Proposed standards will then be submitted to 45 days of public comment. After that, the state Board of Education will have to approve the standards.

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by Tim Willert
Education Reporter
Tim Willert is a native Californian with Oklahoma ties who covers education. Prior to moving to Oklahoma in June 2011, he was as an editor for FOXSports.com in Century City, Calif., and reported on courts for the Los Angeles Daily Journal and...
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