Oklahoma seeks more funds for truck weigh stations

The state has enough money lined up to build five port of entry truck weighing and inspection stations similar to one that opened last month in Kay County, a transportation official says. The new stations have the technological capacity to weigh moving trucks and check their brakes.
BY MICHAEL MCNUTT mmcnutt@opubco.com Published: May 8, 2012
Advertisement
;

The state should have enough money to build five port of entry truck weighing and inspection stations similar to one that recently opened in Kay County, but it will end up short of the money needed to construct three additional stations, Oklahoma's transportation secretary said Monday.

“Funding's not all in place for that to happen,” said Transportation Department Director Gary Ridley, who also serves as transportation secretary on Gov. Mary Fallin's Cabinet. “We don't have enough to build them all.”

Estimates indicate more than 8 million trucks will enter Oklahoma at the nine new, state-of-the-art weigh stations.

Before the Kay County station opened April 27 off Interstate 35 about a mile south of the Kansas line, less than 10 percent of commercial trucks driving on the state's roads were inspected or weighed, state transportation officials said.

Ridley said on average a truck enters the state from Kansas once every 35 seconds.

An identical station is scheduled to open late this summer off Interstate 40 in Beckham County near the Texas line.

High-tech capacity

The new stations will have the technological capacity to weigh moving trucks. Brake checks will also be performed at the stations, which will be connected to nearby exits to detect if trucks get off the highway in an apparent attempt to avoid the stations.

Most of the state's seven weigh stations are outdated and aren't open 24 hours a day. A couple aren't close to the state's borders, such as the one near El Reno, which is about 125 miles from the state's border. The new weigh stations will be open 24 hours a day, seven days a week and will be checking trucks' weight, cargo and drivers.

Ridley said the Kay County center cost about $11 million. The cost includes the land that had to be bought for the station.

Once fully operational, the weigh station will include technology designed to thoroughly inspect and weigh commercial trucks while still on the roadway in an effort to work with the trucking industry to verify trucks are following all state and federal laws. Staff at the station also will be able to electronically and instantly review permits, registration, fuel tax payments and other documentation.

“It's not just the damage to the highways and bridges, which is amazing how much damage overweight trucks can do to bridges and highways, but it's also the safety aspect,” Ridley said. “So that the light vehicles that are traveling on the road know that the truck traveling next to them or right behind them is a safe vehicle.”

| |

Advertisement


It's not just the damage to the highways and bridges, which is amazing how much damage overweight trucks can do to bridges and highways, but it's also the safety aspect. So that the light vehicles that are traveling on the road know that the truck traveling next to them or right behind them is a safe vehicle.”

Gary Ridley

Oklahoma Transportation Department director

Trending Now



AROUND THE WEB

  1. 1
    Hotel leaves Oklahoma City Thunder opponents telling ghost stories
  2. 2
    Check out the Thunder postseason playlist
  3. 3
    VIDEO: Blake Griffin dumps water on a fan
  4. 4
    Oklahoma City Thunder: Grizzlies guard Nick Calathes calls drug suspension unfair
  5. 5
    Dave Chappelle Reveals Shockingly Buff New Look
+ show more