Oklahoma snow: Snow tapers off in Oklahoma City area; 25 inches reported in Jay

About six inches of snow was reported at Will Rogers World Airport in Oklahoma City by the time snow began to end around noon, according to the National Weather Service. But northeastern Oklahoma has been buried under another blanket of heavy snow.
BY MICHAEL KIMBALL Staff Writers mkimball@opubco.com Modified: February 9, 2011 at 1:01 pm •  Published: February 9, 2011

Significant snowfall in the Oklahoma City area is mostly done for the day, but the storm continues to track across northeastern Oklahoma and bury the region under another blanket of heavy snow.

Will Rogers World Airport in Oklahoma City had about 6 inches of snow at noon, and snowfall there had mostly ended by that time, weather service meteorologist Ty Judd said. Most areas of central and western Oklahoma had at least 4 inches of snow, with higher recordings in northern Oklahoma.

Northeast Oklahoma has been hit hardest. Jay in Delaware County had 25 inches as of about 10 a.m., which is the highest reading so far in the state, weather service meteorologist Robert Darby said. Other areas of northeastern Oklahoma had between 18 and 24 inches by 10 a.m., and Tulsa had about 5 inches.

Most of north-central and northwestern Oklahoma had 10 to 15 inches of snow by 10 a.m., weather service meteorologist Forrest Mitchell said. Snowfall there is also mostly finished for the day.

High winds could create blowing snow in the afternoon and evening even after the snow stops, according to the weather service.

Temperatures pose danger to stranded motorists

Daytime high temperatures in the Oklahoma City area and elsewhere in the state will likely stay in the teens at the highest, Judd said. Wind chill factors will remain below zero most of the day throughout Oklahoma.

Officials are urging motorists who must venture out into the snow to bundle up and take extra blankets to stay warm in case they become stranded, Judd said.

But better weather news applies to the days ahead. Daytime high temperatures statewide are expected to rise into the 20s on Thursday, the 30s on Friday, the 40s on Saturday, the 50s on Sunday and the 60s early next week, according to the weather service.

A winter storm warning remains active across most of Oklahoma until 6 p.m.

The state Health Department reported 80 storm-related injuries as of 7 a.m., according to the state Emergency Management Department. The injuries included 63 falls, 14 from transportation-related causes, two from cutting or piercing incidents and one instance of carbon monoxide poisoning.

Drier snow affected easily by wind

The snow formed high in the atmosphere at extremely cold temperatures, and an overall lack of moisture meant snow flakes were relatively dry, Judd said.

“It's the kind of snow that you can maybe take a broom out and get it off your driveway that way,” Judd said. “Or maybe wait for the wind to blow it off.”

But the snow has drifted easily and tends to pile up in certain areas, he said.

Roads slick and hazardous

Roads throughout the state have been reported to be slick, snow-packed and hazardous with drifting adding to the problems, the state Emergency Management Department reported.

Oklahoma Weather Closings Oklahoma Weather Blog


Trending Now


AROUND THE WEB

  1. 1
    ESPN bringing "College GameDay" to Oklahoma State-Florida State
  2. 2
    NCAA suspends Missouri's Levi Copelin, a former Broken Arrow receiver, for 2014 season
  3. 3
    Kevin Durant tells Pelicans F Anthony Davis he's an 'MVP-caliber player'
  4. 4
    Sen. Inhofe blocks vote on resolution acknowledging climate change is a problem
  5. 5
    Raiders owner in talks with San Antonio to relocate team
+ show more