Oklahoma state Capitol to display Ten Commandments

BY MICHAEL MCNUTT Modified: May 19, 2009 at 8:45 am •  Published: May 19, 2009
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The measure identifies the Liberty Legal Institute, which was involved in the defense of the Texas monument, as being available to help the attorney general’s office defend a legal challenge.

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The American Civil Liberties Union of Oklahoma may file a lawsuit depending on how it fares with its challenge to a Ten Commandments monument in Haskell County, said Tamya Cox, the group’s legislative counsel.

"We’re very disappointed the governor signed House Bill 1330,” she said. "It usurped the First Amendment. Thankfully, we have until Nov. 1 before the monument could be erected, so we are going to definitely take our time.”

The Baptist Joint Committee for Religious Liberty also opposed the monument being placed on the Capitol grounds.

"We should be more concerned with following the Ten Commandments rather than merely posting them on government property,” said K. Hollyn Hollman, the committee’s general counsel. "Religion flourishes best when the separation of church and state is protected.”

Sen. Randy Brogdon, Senate sponsor of HB 1330, said he is "tickled pink” the governor signed the measure.

"He chose to be with the people on this one,” said Brogdon, R-Owasso. "It was widely supported by people around the state. I was pleasantly surprised.”