Oklahoma State football: Joe DeForest focused on fixing West Virginia's defense

Although DeForest wants to become a head coach, his current focus is fixing what's wrong. “Everybody's got their problems. OSU's had problems. Heck, three quarterbacks, losing all those receivers and cornerbacks and safeties ... everybody's got problems during the year,” DeForest said.
by John Helsley Published: November 8, 2012

STILLWATER — Reflecting over the phone, contemplating his new surroundings by the bank of the Monongahela River in northern West Virginia, Joe DeForest seems mostly pleased.

“It is such a neat place,” said DeForest, the former Oklahoma State assistant now in his first season in charge of the West Virginia defense. “A great area of the country.

“You know, the leaves change … It's really beautiful here.”

There is, however, one catch.

“If we could just play better defense,” he said, “it would be unbelievable.”

DeForest gave 11 good years to OSU, before joining Dana Holgorsen at West Virginia for a tag of defensive coordinator, a promotion he hoped would help prompt a continued climb up the ladder to a head coaching gig.

And that dream might eventually materialize, although for now, DeForest is solely focused on the difficult job at hand: fixing what's wrong with the Mountaineers. And there's much wrong on defense, as DeForest and West Virginia head for a Saturday showdown with Oklahoma State.

“That's our job as coaches, to try to figure out a way to make it work,” DeForest said. “Everybody's got their problems. OSU's had problems. Heck, three quarterbacks, losing all those receivers and cornerbacks and safeties … everybody's got problems during the year. You've just got to be able to overcome them.

“It's been taxing. But that's part of it.”

Associates report that DeForest wasn't in Morgantown long when he realized the challenge ahead. The Mountaineers lacked speed, at least on his side of the ball, a distressing reality considering the school's impending move to the Big 12 and its big-armed quarterbacks and score-a-minute offenses.

And it didn't take long for fears to be realized, with West Virginia surrendering 63 points — albeit in a wild win — in its Big 12 opener against Baylor. Since then, every league team has put at least 39 points on the Mountaineers, and their league average of points allowed is better than half-a-hundred, 50.2 to be exact.

Nationally, DeForest's crew ranks 116th in scoring defense, 120th — last among all FBS schools — in pass defense and 111th in total defense.

“It's part of moving to a different league and playing with guys who were in the Big East,” he said. “And that's not an excuse.

“We've just got to get better.”

DeForest said he believes the Mountaineers made a shift in the right direction a week ago, even though they lost 39-38 in double-overtime to TCU.

Leaving his familiar spot on the sideline, DeForest moved to the press box for the first time in his career against TCU. Seeing the field better, allowing him to more easily recognize and call adjustments, he said he thought the move was positive.


by John Helsley
OSU Reporter Sr.
John Helsley grew up in Del City, reading all the newspapers and sports magazines he could get his hands on. And Saturday afternoons, when the Major League Game of the Week was on, he'd keep a scorecard for the game. So the sports appeal was was...
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