Oklahoma State football notebook: Ryan Simmons gets to watch sister Meighan Simmons play on Tennessee Senior Day

Middle linebacker Ryan Simmons is the brother of Tennessee women’s basketball star Meighan Simmons. Ryan Simmons hadn’t seen his sister play in Knoxville, Tenn., until March 2, when he accompanied his family to the Volunteers’ Senior Day.
by Berry Tramel Modified: March 15, 2014 at 4:35 pm •  Published: March 15, 2014
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Middle linebacker Ryan Simmons is the brother of Tennessee women’s basketball star Meighan Simmons. Ryan Simmons hadn’t seen his sister play in Knoxville, Tenn., until March 2, when he accompanied his family to the Volunteers’ Senior Day.

“Just a great time for us,” Simmons said. “Honestly, my sister, she’s on another level. Ever since she was a little girl, she’s always had that tenacious attitude. Put her on a team of boys, 2-3 years older, she’ll still be out there fighting as if she was their age and their size. My sister, she goes out there like that every time … just going out about it as if it was your last time playing.”

JOHNSON THRILLED WITH SCHOLARSHIP

OSU fullback Teddy Johnson got a call from assistant coach Jemal Singleton awhile back. It sounded promising. It was. After three years as a walk-on, Johnson was being given a scholarship.

Singleton “left me a pretty nice and encouraging voicemail,” Johnson said. “I came into the stadium to meet with Mack Butler (director of football operations), and he had the paper out and the pen for me to sign with.”

Johnson, who is from the Dallas suburb of Coppell, called his father, Mitch Johnson, an OSU graduate.

“He was joyful,” Teddy Johnson said. “I don’t want to say he was ecstatic, but he was happy. He didn’t have to cut that tuition check this year.”

Both of Johnson’s parents are OSU alumni. Johnson said his dad, specifically, is proud.

“Even now he’s still very much involved with OSU,” Johnson said, “so for this to be his alma mater and for his son to follow him here and achieve something in the athletics world meant a lot to him.”

Johnson has made his mark mostly on kick coverage units. He’s got 20 tackles as a Cowboy.

“Every walk-on’s dream is to not only play, but to eventually be rewarded and that their school is paid for,” Johnson said. “To me personally, that was a huge goal. Most people didn’t think I could play college football. For me to walk on and not only be a four-year letterman, but to be given a full ride just changed everybody’s perspective, as well it made it all worth it. It was a very proud moment for me my family.”


by Berry Tramel
Columnist
Berry Tramel, a lifelong Oklahoman, sports fan and newspaper reader, joined The Oklahoman in 1991 and has served as beat writer, assistant sports editor, sports editor and columnist. Tramel grew up reading four daily newspapers — The Oklahoman,...
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