Oklahoma Supreme Court terminates contract for construction of super website

Oklahoma will try to complete delayed system on its own.
by Nolan Clay and Randy Ellis Published: June 11, 2014
Advertisement
;

In a move that upset legislators, the Oklahoma Supreme Court has canceled an $11 million contract with the company that was creating a super website of court information.

Eighteen months behind schedule, the website is supposed to allow the public free online access to court records from all 77 counties.

“We’re going to try to pick it up and see if we can finish it ourselves,” said Mike Evans, administrative director of the courts.

Chief Justice Tom Colbert on Monday announced the termination of the contract with Virginia-based American Cadastre LLC. The chief justice said the Legislature in the last days of the legislative session took $10 million of the project’s funding, “necessitating this action.”

“That contract provided that ‘if all or part of the applicable funding becomes unavailable to the client’ the contract may be terminated,” Colbert said.

That explanation angered legislators, particularly since the information technology fund has more than $30 million in it.

The $10 million taken from that total will go toward other court expenses.

State Rep. Mark McCullough, chairman of the judiciary subcommittee of the House Appropriations and Budget Committee, called the court’s action disingenuous and reactionary. He also said it opens the state up to a potential lawsuit.

“It’s very difficult for me to not call ‘bull’ on that,” said McCullough, R-Sapulpa. “Not one time during the multiple discussions I had with the chief justice and Mike Evans, the administrator of the court, during the entirety of the session did this ever get brought up to me ... that the contract would be ended due to the transfer of $10 million from that IT fund to operations.

“The impression I got in the discussions was — because that $10 million could potentially be tapped for raises — that was looked at as something that would be acceptable.”

He also said, “The IT project has been languishing. For years they’ve been working on that. The Legislature I think has been exceedingly patient. ... That fund had $30 million in it. ... They don’t spend it all. They’ve never spent it all. They’ve got a big surplus. ...

Continue reading this story on the...

by Nolan Clay
Sr. Reporter
Nolan Clay was born in Oklahoma and has worked as a reporter for The Oklahoman since 1985. He covered the Oklahoma City bombing trials and witnessed bomber Tim McVeigh's execution. His investigative reports have brought down public officials,...
+ show more

by Randy Ellis
Capitol Bureau Reporter
For the past 30 years, staff writer Randy Ellis has exposed public corruption and government mismanagement in news articles. Ellis has investigated problems in Oklahoma's higher education institutions and wrote stories that ultimately led to two...
+ show more


Trending Now


AROUND THE WEB

  1. 1
    Former Texas Tech DC Matt Wallerstedt says 'don't believe' rumors of dismissal
  2. 2
    Sex crime charges filed against former Tulsa County sheriff's deputy
  3. 3
    White House will now lock the front door | WashingtonExaminer.com
  4. 4
    Report: Baker Mayfield to receive a third year of eligibility effective immediately
  5. 5
    OU football: Tony Jefferson making an impact with Arizona Cardinals
+ show more