Oklahoma tornadoes: Foreclosure sales stall with moratorium

The tornadoes are also having a much bigger impact on the area's overall real estate market, according to Sheldon Detrick, CEO of Prudential Detrick Alliance Realty in Oklahoma City and Tulsa.
FROM STAFF REPORTS Published: June 25, 2013
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Foreclosure auctions fell sharply in May after three months of increases probably because of a moratorium on foreclosures following the May tornadoes, according to Irvine, Calif.-based property data firm RealtyTrac.

Foreclosure auctions were down 47 percent from April and down 26 percent from a year ago in May, the firm reported.

Foreclosure starts were down 30 percent year-over-year in May, but bank repossessions were up 52 percent, the third straight month with an annual increase, the firm said.

RealtyTrac's Oklahoma Foreclosure Market Report showed foreclosure filings — default notices, scheduled auctions and bank repossessions — were reported on 1,123 Oklahoma properties in May, a decrease of 11 percent from April and down 13 percent from May 2012.

One in every 1,475 Oklahoma housing units had a foreclosure filing in May, below the national average of one in 885 housing units, No. 28 highest among all states, RealtyTrac said.

The tornadoes are also having a much bigger impact on the area's overall real estate market, according to Sheldon Detrick, CEO of Prudential Detrick Alliance Realty in Oklahoma City and Tulsa.

“We have 4,000 homes totally destroyed, and another 10,000 homes damaged — a large part of which are uninhabitable,” Detrick said. “We lived — in May 1999 — through the previous tornado that struck the area. We know what that was like. And that of course was followed by a construction boom. We had construction crews in here building as fast as they could and we anticipate that trend this time.

“But right now, people can't find a place to live. You can't find a place to rent. Churches are taking in people. People are taking in people. Adversity brings us together, and this is a king-sized adversity. And we are united. We are rebuilding and coming back.”

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