Share “Oklahoma U.S. Sen. Jim Inhofe promotes...”

Oklahoma U.S. Sen. Jim Inhofe promotes global warming skepticism and his book at House hearing

Republicans aiming to bar the Environmental Protection Agency from regulating greenhouse gases.
BY CHRIS CASTEEL ccasteel@opubco.com Modified: February 10, 2011 at 11:09 am •  Published: February 10, 2011
Advertisement

For more than 10 years, Sen. Jim Inhofe has figuratively written the book on skepticism about human-induced global warming. Now, he's actually finished a book, to be called “Hoax,” a reference to his famous — or infamous, depending on the viewpoint — description of global warming.

“You'll be the first to receive an autographed copy,” Inhofe, R-Tulsa, told California Rep. Henry Waxman on Wednesday at a House subcommittee hearing about whether the Environmental Protection Agency should be able to regulate greenhouse gases.

Inhofe — who doesn't have a publisher or a target release date for his book — was the leading witness at the Energy and Power subcommittee hearing, which, at least for the first couple of hours, was little more than a forum for Republicans and Democrats to air well-established positions on the EPA's role and the larger issue of global warming.

Inhofe told Waxman that he still believes human-induced global warming is a hoax. And he told the subcommittee that, even if it weren't, regulations to reduce greenhouse gas emissions would have almost no effect on global temperatures but cost the U.S. economy between $300 billion and $400 billion a year.

Waxman, a Democrat, cited numerous scientific panels and government agencies that had concluded climate change posed a hazard to human health and said it was “quite amazing” that Inhofe wouldn't want to do anything about it.

“Saying there's no problem, it's all a hoax, is not a responsible answer,'' Waxman said.

Waxman authored legislation to limit greenhouse gas emissions, which was approved by the House when it was under Democratic control. However, the Senate never considered climate change legislation in the last Congress.

Republican concerns

The concern of Republicans, who now control the House, is that the EPA is setting out to curb carbon emissions through a series of regulations, both for vehicles and stationary sources, such as power plants.

Continue reading this story on the...