Oklahoma United Methodists find different ways to offer ministry

The Oklahoma United Methodist Conference is exploring different ways to keep church doors open and remain vital in urban and rural areas of the state.
by Carla Hinton Modified: September 28, 2013 at 10:00 pm •  Published: September 28, 2013
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The merger of May Avenue United Methodist and Ridgecrest United Methodist into Cornerstone is one example of the diverse ways Oklahoma's United Methodists are offering ministry throughout the state.

The Rev. Robert Hayes Jr. said he and conference leaders like to try alternatives that keep churches from closing their doors.

In Oklahoma City, they have created what he called satellite congregations by placing smaller, inner-city churches such as Hillcrest Fuente de Vita, 5801 S Pennsylvania, and Christ United Methodist Church, 1006 NE 17, under the umbrella of a vital larger church, in this case, St. Luke's United Methodist, 222 NW 15.

“You put them under a mother church, a strong church with a strong DNA,” said Hayes, bishop for the Oklahoma United Methodist Conference.

He also said he has been pleased with a creative church venture in rural Oklahoma.

Two sisters in Fitzhugh, in Pontotoc County, have brought new life to Roff United Methodist Church, he said. The church was closed in 2011 due to dwindling membership and finances.

Lynn Cordial and Sherry Jones, members of Fitzhugh United Methodist, were heartbroken to see the church in the nearby city close its doors. Cordial said the Roff church has been in existence more than 100 years.

She said she and her sister had recently retired and moved from other places back to Fitzhugh to be with their mother and become part of the community again.

She said they were driving in the smaller city of Roff one day and stopped to look in the windows of the Roff church.

She said they immediately knew they wanted to see the church open again as a faith-centered building.

The church had closed Dec. 31, 2011, and signs of the joyous Christmas season, such as a nativity scene, could be seen from the window.

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by Carla Hinton
Religion Editor
Carla Hinton, an Oklahoma City native, joined The Oklahoman in 1986 as a National Society of Newspaper Editors minority intern. She began reporting full-time for The Oklahoman two years later and has served as a beat writer covering a wide...
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