Oklahoma will not review protocol after recent executions

The state has no plans to review its lethal injection protocol after two inmates executed this month complained as drugs began to flow through their bodies.
By JUSTIN JUOZAPAVICIUS Published: January 28, 2014

The Oklahoma Department of Corrections said it will not initiate a review of the state's execution protocol after the Wilson and Hogan executions. And a spokeswoman for Attorney General Scott Pruitt said Oklahoma's execution method is “in compliance with the law.”

“Our protocol was appropriate, and we have no plans to change it,” said Department of Corrections spokesman Jerry Massie. He said the comments made by the inmates “are somewhat normal reactions,” and noted that it didn't appear that Wilson or Hogan were in any kind of distress after they made the comments after receiving the drugs.

Ohio incident cited

Massie said because of a recent execution in Ohio — it took an inmate 26 minutes to die after he snorted and gasped — more people have become sensitive to the issue, including inmates and their defense attorneys.

Unlike some states dealing with shortages of the drugs used for executions or upcoming expiration dates, Oklahoma is not facing similar problems, Massie said.

Oklahoma's execution methods have been lambasted by groups including the American Civil Liberties Union, which called on the corrections department to initiate a review of how it puts inmates to death in light of the complaints made by Wilson and Hogan.