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Oklahoma's Jay Martin of Martin Bionics plays role in development of NASA 'Iron Man' suit

Jay Martin’s work in engineering revolutionary prosthetics designs dates back to 2002, when Martin worked as a clinical prosthetist at Oklahoma City’s Scott Sabolich Prosthetics and Research Center. Now
By Jim Stafford Modified: August 4, 2014 at 12:00 pm •  Published: August 3, 2014
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Jay Martin is unimposing in stature, humble in personality and grateful for the doors that life has opened for him as an Oklahoma innovator, inventor and entrepreneur.

So why do I see Marvel Entertainment’s Tony Stark as he walks into a conference room at i2E to discuss his role in creating innovative technologies?

It is because of the Iron Man suit.

Martin is a vital part of a team of innovators assembled by NASA to create exoskeletal robotic suits, akin to an “Iron Man” suit.

These ongoing projects have a futuristic goal: develop a robotic suit that provides enhanced strength and capabilities for users ranging from astronauts to special ops soldiers to people who have suffered nerve and spinal injuries, allowing them to walk again.

Martin was tasked with the challenge of merging proprietary prosthetic man/machine interface technology he developed as founder of Oklahoma City’s Martin Bionics Innovations into NASA’s exoskeleton robotics projects.

“I’ve enjoyed the opportunity to spend so much time in Houston at the Johnson Space Center,” Martin said of the NASA project. “The level of sophistication of the NASA engineers I’m working with is phenomenal.”

Before he was invited into the NASA project, Martin established himself as a groundbreaking inventor of prosthetic technology that advanced the state of the industry, providing amputees with more comfort and mobility.

As a result, Martin Bionics was recognized as Oklahoma’s Innovator of the Year in 2008.

Martin’s work in engineering revolutionary prosthetics designs dates back to 2002, when Martin worked as a clinical prosthetist at Oklahoma City’s Scott Sabolich Prosthetics and Research Center. A Norman native, Martin applied for and was awarded his first research grant from the Oklahoma Center for the Advancement of Science and Technology (OCAST).

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I’ve enjoyed the opportunity to spend so much time in Houston at the Johnson Space Center. The level of sophistication of the NASA engineers I’m working with is phenomenal.”

Jay Martin,

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