Share “Oklahoma's Millard draws task of taking on...”

Oklahoma's Millard draws task of taking on Te'o

Associated Press Modified: October 25, 2012 at 3:03 pm •  Published: October 25, 2012
Advertisement

NORMAN, Okla. (AP) — There was a time during Bob Stoops' tenure as Oklahoma coach that the notion of letting the fullback run the ball was dismissed without much consideration. Why give the ball to a blocker when the running back had so much more playmaking potential?

Then Trey Millard came in and changed everything.

Millard has expanded his previous role of merely smashing into opposing defenders to clear room for others by displaying a wide-ranging skill set that makes him a threat as a ball-carrier and a pass-catcher. And for the eighth-ranked Sooners' showdown Saturday night against No. 5 Notre Dame (7-0), Millard's job will include finding a way to neutralize Manti Te'o, who's garnering rare Heisman Trophy buzz at the linebacker position.

"That's part of the reason you come here is to play with the best but also play against the best," Millard said, grass stains on his pants from an afternoon at practice. "That's definitely a matchup that I'm looking forward to."

Oklahoma coach Bob Stoops said the assignment of blocking Te'o will go to "whoever draws the unlucky straw."

Millard expects he'll be doing much of the dirty work, whether it's trying to track down Te'o and open room for Oklahoma's running backs or trying to get open against him to catch a pass from Landry Jones.

Regardless of the assignment, he knows it won't be easy.

"He's a great player. Everybody knows that," Millard said. "An All-American guy."

Millard had three touches that yielded zero yards in a 24-19 loss to Kansas State last month. He then had a 73-yard reception on a short pass in the Red River Rivalry against Texas, leaping over one defender while shoving another away. He's also caught a touchdown pass each of the past two weeks.

He's part fullback, part running back, part tight end and part wide receiver. That versatility makes him a critical part of the offense for Oklahoma (5-1), which can line up in a variety of formations without substituting in its no-huddle offense.

"I like doing it all. I love being able to move around," said Millard, listed at 6-foot-2 and 256 pounds. "It's kind of funny. I don't see it always in games against other guys but sometimes in practice, like during two-a-days, where we're going against our own guys and they get confused and it's kind of my fault. It's kind of fun to know that you caused that and helped make a play for the offense."

Continue reading this story on the...