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Oklahoma's public umbilical cord blood bank is up and running

Oklahoma Blood Institute's cord blood bank is awaiting approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration before the donations that it receives can be used to treat patients.
by Jaclyn Cosgrove Modified: January 29, 2014 at 8:00 pm •  Published: January 28, 2014

/articleid/3928230/1/pictures/2331572">Photo - Charles Mooney demonstrates the method of storing and removing cord blood products in one of two cryo storage tanks. The blood is contained in cartridges which are inserted into holding racks. Each tank can store 1,876 cord blood products.  Mooney is vice president of quality management at the core blood bank facility. Oklahoma Blood Institute hosted the grand opening of its new Cord Blood Bank Tuesday afternoon, Jan. 28, 2014. It is one of only 24 such centers worldwide. Umbilical cord blood that potentially can save lives has been thrown away after the births of babies across our state in the past. . Without a local public umbilical cord blood bank, most Oklahoma mothers have no option to donate it. Now, families at OU Medical Center, celebrating a joyous event in their own lives can bring the same to those battling leukemia and other blood disorders with little hope. Other hospitals will be enlisted to partner in the future.     Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman
Charles Mooney demonstrates the method of storing and removing cord blood products in one of two cryo storage tanks. The blood is contained in cartridges which are inserted into holding racks. Each tank can store 1,876 cord blood products. Mooney is vice president of quality management at the core blood bank facility. Oklahoma Blood Institute hosted the grand opening of its new Cord Blood Bank Tuesday afternoon, Jan. 28, 2014. It is one of only 24 such centers worldwide. Umbilical cord blood that potentially can save lives has been thrown away after the births of babies across our state in the past. . Without a local public umbilical cord blood bank, most Oklahoma mothers have no option to donate it. Now, families at OU Medical Center, celebrating a joyous event in their own lives can bring the same to those battling leukemia and other blood disorders with little hope. Other hospitals will be enlisted to partner in the future. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman

Meeting a pricey need

Before its opening, Oklahoma did not have a public cord blood center. Rather, the umbilical cord blood was commonly thrown away after births — unless a family had the thousands of dollars it can take to store the cord blood at a private cord blood center.

Dixon, a labor and delivery nurse for about 25 years, has seen families use private cord blood banks and is happy Oklahomans have another option.

“(Private banking) is expensive, and it costs parents a load of money up front, plus a monthly charge the rest of their lives,” Dixon said. “This is an even better way because you can donate for free, there's no monthly cost, and it can benefit anybody.”

That's one of the reasons Dr. James Smith, Oklahoma Blood Institute chief medical officer, is excited about the cord blood bank — the potential to save lives that otherwise might have been lost.

The cord blood that Dixon brings over is taken to a lab. From there, the stem cells are removed, and they're placed into small bags that are frozen in a freezer kept cool by liquid nitrogen.

The stem cells from cord blood can be used to treat people with cancers, blood disorders, congenital metabolic disorders and immunodeficiencies, according to an article published in the Journal of Perinatal Education.

But in order for patients to receive those stem cells, they generally must find a match. This process can prove difficult if the patient is a racial minority.

Smith said because of Oklahoma's large percentage of American Indians, the facility likely will gather donations from American Indian mothers, which could turn into stem cells used to treat other American Indians with leukemia and other blood disorders.

“We're hoping to be able to provide a source of cells that has been almost impossible to find, primarily for the minority groups so we would have cells that would be used to support transplants,” he said. “If they have leukemia or some other cancer, and they cannot find a match, the cancer will kill them.”

by Jaclyn Cosgrove
Medical and Health Reporter
Jaclyn Cosgrove writes about health, public policy and medicine in Oklahoma, among other topics. She is an Oklahoma State University graduate. Jaclyn grew up in the southeast region of the state and enjoys writing about rural Oklahoma. She is...
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