On Sunday, daylight saving time begins and clocks will be moved forward one hour

Former NBA player and current Oklahoma City Thunder TV analyst adjusted to time zones.
BY BRYAN PAINTER bpainter@opubco.com Published: March 9, 2013
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“If you get up early on the West Coast, you have to make yourself lie back down. I found I could do that. Or I could grab a nap a few hours before the game. And that got my body's timing back to where it should be.”

Long said his sleep habits stayed the same after he retired from playing and became an analyst.

“I still nap in the afternoon, but now instead of getting ready to practice or play a game I get ready to analyze one of the two,” he said.

In the first seven days of March, the Thunder played four games, each in a different time zone. That's part of the game, Long said.

“At the end of the day, as a player you recognize that everybody goes through the same schedule at some point,” he said.

“When you realize that, you say to yourself, ‘That's not an excuse. We're here to play, there's a court, there's two rims. We've got a job to do.' And you go out and do it. You don't use the excuse of we're in a different time zone. You've got to get past that.”

And get past that experience on the day the time changed in April 2003.

On Sunday, Long will be working with the Thunder Radio Network broadcast since ABC is carrying the game on television.

Guess who the Thunder plays at home Sunday? Boston.