On Sunday, daylight saving time begins and clocks will be moved forward one hour

Former NBA player and current Oklahoma City Thunder TV analyst adjusted to time zones.
BY BRYAN PAINTER bpainter@opubco.com Published: March 9, 2013
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Nearly a decade has passed, but for Grant Long, the feeling hasn't.

Sunday, daylight saving time begins, and clocks will be moved forward one hour.

Long, a former NBA player and current Oklahoma City Thunder television analyst, said the time change didn't pose a problem for him — except on April 6, 2003.

Long was with the Boston Celtics in his last of 15 seasons.

He played slightly more than 1,000 NBA games. He was usually at an arena at least two hours before game time.

He said he was never late. Except for April 6, 2003.

Long thinks back to that Sunday in 2003.

Maybe he was just running late and the time change added to the unfortunate scenario.

He not only missed the 1 p.m. tipoff against Michael Jordan and the Washington Wizards, the game was in the second quarter when he walked into the FleetCenter in Boston.

That's where the feeling that has lasted 10 years comes into play.

“I'm driving up to the arena thinking, ‘Why are all these people here so early?'” Long said. “After 15 seasons of playing, that was the only time that the spring forward ever got me. I still don't know what happened to this day.

“I'm thinking the coach is going to be yelling at me.”

Overall, even with all the travel, even with traveling from time zone to time zone, Long said that wasn't a problem for him.

“I made that mistake of getting up at 6 a.m. West Coast time early in my career, because my body told me it was 9 a.m. on the East Coast,” said Long, 46.

“Even though your body is telling you you are not tired, it's not a good idea to get up. By the time the game rolled round, I was dead tired. I'm in the locker room, and the coach is going over the game plan while my eyelids are getting heavy, I'm nodding off, because my internal clock said it's time to go to bed.