OSU basketball: Short-handed Cowboys fighting through fatigue

Coach Travis Ford trying to give basketball team as much rest as possible — but the Cowboys have to remain on their toes.
BY JOHN HELSLEY, Staff Writer, jhelsley@opubco.com Published: February 19, 2012

Keiton Page stood hunched over near midcourt Saturday, tugging up the toes of his right Nike, trying to find relief for the attack of a leg cramp, as the Cowboys readied for the stretch run against Texas.

Page was deep into a hard-earned 40-point performance, so some cramping could be expected.

Yet it wasn't likely just a single-game accumulation, no matter how hard Page was forced to work against a Longhorns defense finely focused on stopping him. For Page and his fellow OSU starters, the Big 12 schedule has been nothing short of a grind, due to a shrunken roster and a lacking trust factor by coach Travis Ford in his limited bench.

The heavy load just might be catching up to the Cowboys, who are heavy on freshmen who could be hitting the rookie wall.

And Ford knows it, adding yet another hurdle in what has been a season that keeps delivering challenges for the fourth-year coach.

Fatigue.

“It's kind of tough when we have six, seven guys playing,” Page said. “And some of us are playing 35 minutes-plus. But Coach was really good the past few days about giving us our rest and getting our legs back underneath us.”

The legs were absent in Wednesday night's blowout loss at Missouri, which followed a Saturday game at Kansas in which the Cowboys scrapped throughout the second half to restore some respectability.

In conference games, Page leads the Big 12 in minutes played, averaging 36.9 per game. Brian Williams ranks sixth at 34.9.

The other Cowboys starters: Markel Brown 32.8, Le'Bryan Nash 31.8 and Michael Cobbins 31.6.

And those numbers have spiked since Philip Jurick injured his foot almost a month ago, with the starters regularly playing in excess of 37 minutes every time out.

Ford likes his current starting five. And the more they play, the better OSU's chances of winning.

But that comes at a cost. So Ford is forced to adjust, which he's doing.

“I saw it in the Missouri game,” Ford said. “In time outs, our guys were wanting it so bad, but you could tell they were listening to me, but they could never get it going.

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