Outdoors Notebook: Reward offered in Cherokee County shooting

by Ed Godfrey Modified: December 8, 2013 at 4:24 pm •  Published: December 8, 2013

The Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation is offering up to $500 for information in the shooting of a deer hunter in Cherokee County last weekend.

The agency is offering the reward through its Operation Game Thief program (800) 522-8039.

The Oklahoma Game Warden's Association also is offering a $500 reward for information about the shooting.

John Mason of Tulsa was shot in the arm on Nov. 29 near Welling in Cherokee County, presumably by another deer hunter.

Mason was heading back to his truck after a day of deer hunting when he heard a shot. Before he could call to a shooter, a second shot hit him in the arm.

His father, who was hunting nearby, heard the shot and transported Mason to a hospital in Tahlequah, where he was airlifted to a Tulsa hospital.

Mason will need at least six months of physical therapy to recover.

The Cherokee County's Sheriff's Department said a red, four-door Dodge truck was seen in the area at the time of the shooting.

TWO HUNTERS DIE AFTER TREE STAND FALLS

There have been at least two hunting-related deaths this deer gun season from tree stand falls.

A deer hunter in Cherokee County died last weekend after falling from a tree stand and getting tangled in his harness, said Lance Meek, hunter education coordinator for the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation.

Another hunter in Pottawatomie County died from a head injury after falling while installing a tree stand before deer gun season opened, Meek said.

Over the last 20 years, Oklahoma has averaged about two hunting-related fatalities each year, Meek said.

“Some years we will have none,” Meek said. “People are getting a lot better about not shooting each year, but tree stand injuries are increasing.”

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by Ed Godfrey
Reporter Sr.
Ed Godfrey was born in Muskogee and raised in Stigler. He has worked at The Oklahoman for 25 years. During that time, he has worked a myriad of beats for The Oklahoman including both the federal and county courthouse in Oklahoma City for more...
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