Outlook 2013: Oklahoma State University Center for Veterinary Health Sciences prepares for future

by Silas Allen Published: April 28, 2013
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Much of the research done in veterinary science eventually finds its way into human medicine, Sander said. For example, a vaccine to prevent against human papilloma virus, a contributing factor in cervical cancer, has only become available relatively recently.

“We’ve had that in veterinary medicine for decades,” she said.

Veterinary science is also a key player in food security, she said, because many deadly pathogens like salmonella and E. coli are foodborne microorganisms.

In the decades to come, she hopes to see greater collaboration between veterinary and human medicine. As grant funding becomes harder to secure, she said, it’s important that both sides make the best use of all resources that are available to them.

“We need to be more creative in how we collaborate,” she said.

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by Silas Allen
General Assignment/Breaking News Reporter
Silas Allen is a news reporter for The Oklahoman. He is a Missouri native and a 2008 graduate of the University of Missouri.
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