Painkiller overdose deaths grow among Oklahoma women

Overdose death rates from prescription painkillers are rising much faster in middle-age women than men, with the trend more pronounced in Oklahoma than in most states, according to a report released Tuesday by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
BY CARMEN FORMAN cforman@opubco.com Modified: July 2, 2013 at 10:07 pm •  Published: July 2, 2013
Advertisement
;

Overdose death rates from prescription painkillers are rising much faster in middle-age women than men, with the trend more pronounced in Oklahoma than in most states, according to a national report released Tuesday.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report shows deaths from prescription painkillers, which they list as including Vicodin (hydrocodone), OxyContin (oxycodone), Opana (oxymorphone) and methadone, increased fivefold nationwide among women and 3.6 times for men between 1999 and 2010. More people died of prescription painkiller overdoses than car crashes since 2007. These painkiller overdoses killed four times more people than cocaine and heroin overdoses combined in 2010.

Oklahoma's numbers

Oklahoma overdose death rates are growing faster than national rates. According to the state Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services, the prescription painkiller death rate among men in Oklahoma rose from 56 in 1999 to 296 in 2010; for women, the rate jumped from 29 in 1999 to 204 in 2010.

Prescription drug abuse is Oklahoma's fastest-growing drug problem, Mental Health Commissioner Terri White said. It's hard to pinpoint why Oklahoma ranks so high, but the state has consistently had a long history of chronic drug abuse.

“Women and men often get medication because they have real pain, but then it turns into addiction,” White said.

Oklahoma was among a half-dozen states with the highest prescription drug overdose death rates in 2009-10, at 15 to 18.5 deaths per 100,000 people. Nationally, 15,323 women died from such overdoses.

A previous study showed Oklahoma as the top state for the nonmedical use of painkillers and ninth for fatal painkiller abuse.

Female overdose death rates are highest among American Indians, Alaska Natives and non-Hispanic whites from 45 to 54 years of age, the CDC report showed.

Women are more likely than men to be prescribed painkillers, given higher doses and use them for longer periods because of chronic pain, White said. They also are more likely to become dependent on such painkillers after taking them for legitimate reasons.

| |

Advertisement


Trending Now



AROUND THE WEB

  1. 1
    Conservative Activist Claims Women Paid The Same As Men Won't Find Husbands
  2. 2
    Report: Thunder to open playoffs on Saturday
  3. 3
    Former Sonics guard Gary Payton: Durant, Westbrook 'the new era'
  4. 4
    GOP consulting firm employee starts 'Boats 'N Hoes PAC'
  5. 5
    Why One Man Traveled Almost 3,000 Miles To Take On The Federal Government At A Ranch In Nevada
+ show more