Parnell calls out Alaska senators in oil speech

Associated Press Modified: October 12, 2012 at 8:00 pm •  Published: October 12, 2012
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JUNEAU, Alaska (AP) — Gov. Sean Parnell, who has taken aim at Senate Democrats for their position on his oil tax-cut plans, named names in a speech this week to the Alaska Support Industry Alliance.

The industry group has supported the Republican governor's push to cut taxes as a way to boost industry investment and help reverse a trend of declining oil production. Parnell told members of the group that some legislators think Alaska's economy is going to shrink, so government needs to get all the money it can now.

Urged by some in the audience to give names, the governor said Democratic Sens. Bill Wielechowski and Hollis French of Anchorage and Joe Paskvan of Fairbanks were among the senators who have a different view of economics than he and other legislators do.

A video of the speech was released through Parnell's social media feeds on Friday.

Parnell has been critical of the Senate's bipartisan majority for its resistance to his tax-cut plans, and has tailored that criticism more narrowly to Senate Democrats as the election year has unfolded.

Wielechowski and French have been among the staunchest defenders of the current tax structure, known as Alaska's Clear and Equitable Share, or ACES.

The two senators and Paskvan have challenged Parnell and his administration on his tax-cut plans. All three lawmakers are in re-election fights.

Parnell has been raising raise money for Republican candidates, including at least some of the senators' opponents.

"The senators I mentioned, and those who think like them, have done nothing to turn around declining North Slope production," Parnell said in the speech. "They've done nothing to grow Alaska's economy. Instead, they protected status quo decline."

He referred to them as senators "with a spine for decline."

Neither Wielechowski nor Paskvan had heard the speech. Wielechowski called Parnell's tax plan a giveaway, "with no strings attached," that would be disastrous for the state's economy and budget.

"He wants to take Alaska from being an owner state to being an owned state," he said.

Wielechowski noted that the Senate passed legislation during the regular session that would spur production from new fields.