Pat Jones 'roughed it' during successful tenure at OSU

The Oklahoma Sports Hall of Fame inductee was in the office early and stayed late. That's just a part of what it took to make the Cowboys post three 10-win seasons under Jones.
by Berry Tramel Modified: August 5, 2012 at 6:38 pm •  Published: August 5, 2012
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photo - COLLEGE FOOTBALL: "OSU coach Pat Jones leads the linemen onto the field for pre-game drill" as the Oklahoma State University Cowboys hosted the Tulsa Hurricane.  OSU prevailed, 24-19. Staff photo by Doug Hoke taken 9/26/92; photo ran in the 9/27/92 Daily Oklahoman.
COLLEGE FOOTBALL: "OSU coach Pat Jones leads the linemen onto the field for pre-game drill" as the Oklahoma State University Cowboys hosted the Tulsa Hurricane. OSU prevailed, 24-19. Staff photo by Doug Hoke taken 9/26/92; photo ran in the 9/27/92 Daily Oklahoman.

In the splendor of OSU's newfound football status as a national power, sometimes we forget just how good the Cowboys were in the 1980s.

Not always. Not Monday night, when Pat Jones, the coach of those OSU teams, goes into the Oklahoma Sports Hall of Fame.

The Mike Gundy Cowboys the last five years: 48-17. The Jones Cowboys from 1984-88: 44-15. Gundy has the Big 12 title and Fiesta Bowl victory; he also has a glittering new stadium.

“The guy had his hands tied here,” said Gundy, Jones' quarterback from 1986-89. “It was extremely difficult. People talked a lot about (the success) of other sports. It's not the same with football, without the tools.”

Jones doesn't disagree. OSU was a hard job back in the '80s. Jones arrived in 1979 with Jimmy Johnson; the Cowboys were on probation and morale was down.

“He was always at the office early, then would stay late,” Gundy said of Jones. “One thing I've always remembered with him, and he said this to me as a young coach and I really didn't understand it … ‘If you go to a big city – Chicago, New York City – and in those buildings where people make a lot of money, the lights are on at 6:30 or 7 in the morning, and they don't go off at 5.' I always remember that.”

Sure, Jones says now, it was hard winning at a place where you might lose a valued assistant coach over salary and where your facilities were just average and your stadium was decrepit. Hard, but fun.

“It wasn't hard coaching (Thurman) Thomas and (Barry) Sanders and (Leslie) O'Neal and (Hart Lee) Dykes,” Jones said. “But running the program, it was always hard.

“You didn't just work for the sake of putting in time. It was all quality stuff. And I won't lie. We played pretty hard at times.

“We didn't have some of the answers they have now. We lost some quality guys (assistants) probably over $15 or $20,000. That makes it hard for a head coach. What we had to do back then was way more homemade than what they do now.”

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by Berry Tramel
Columnist
Berry Tramel, a lifelong Oklahoman, sports fan and newspaper reader, joined The Oklahoman in 1991 and has served as beat writer, assistant sports editor, sports editor and columnist. Tramel grew up reading four daily newspapers — The...
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