Britain Polictics

  British Prime Minister David Cameron leaves 10 Downing Street for the Prime Minister's Questions at the House of Common in London, Wednesday, Sept. 5, 2012. Seeking to win back support and boost his prospects before the 2015 national election, Cameron on Tuesday made the first major overhaul of his Cabinet and 100-strong ministerial team since taking office in 2010. While Cameron left most senior allies in place, he sought to sharpen his economic message by promoting a crop of young fiscal conservatives, and looked to exploit the success of the Olympic Games in appointing Paul Deighton, chief executive of the London organizing committee, as a new finance minister. (AP Photo/Sang Tan)
British Prime Minister David Cameron leaves 10 Downing Street for the Prime Minister's Questions at the House of Common in London, Wednesday, Sept. 5, 2012. Seeking to win back support and boost his prospects before the 2015 national election, Cameron on Tuesday made the first major overhaul of his Cabinet and 100-strong ministerial team since taking office in 2010. While Cameron left most senior allies in place, he sought to sharpen his economic message by promoting a crop of young fiscal conservatives, and looked to exploit the success of the Olympic Games in appointing Paul Deighton, chief executive of the London organizing committee, as a new finance minister. (AP Photo/Sang Tan)

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