Sept 11 Cancer

  In this Thursday, June 14, 2012 photo, NYPD Officer Reggie Hilaire, 41, poses for a picture in New York. Hilaire spent time looking for human remains right after the Sept. 11, 2001 terrorist attacks and later developed multiple cancers. Several experts say there's no hard evidence to support the federal government's declaration this month that 50 kinds of cancer could be caused by exposure to World Trade Center dust. The decision could help hundreds of people get payouts from a multibillion-dollar World Trade Center health fund to repay those ailing after they breathed in toxic dust created by the collapsing twin towers on Sept. 11, 2001. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)
In this Thursday, June 14, 2012 photo, NYPD Officer Reggie Hilaire, 41, poses for a picture in New York. Hilaire spent time looking for human remains right after the Sept. 11, 2001 terrorist attacks and later developed multiple cancers. Several experts say there's no hard evidence to support the federal government's declaration this month that 50 kinds of cancer could be caused by exposure to World Trade Center dust. The decision could help hundreds of people get payouts from a multibillion-dollar World Trade Center health fund to repay those ailing after they breathed in toxic dust created by the collapsing twin towers on Sept. 11, 2001. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)

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