Being Doctor Ruth

  In this Thursday, April 26, 2012 photo, Dr. Ruth Westheimer signs a copy of her book for a fan at the National Council of Jewish Women in New York. In 1980, Westheimer broke into late-night radio with "Sexually Speaking," launching a career as confider-in-chief. The voice that Westheimer found on radio, and in the books and television shows that followed, pushed the boundaries of popular culture, declaring it not just safe, but healthy, for people to speak explicitly about their sex lives. A generation after the country embraced the Ruthian ethic of sexual honesty and moved on, what's left for Dr. Ruth, now an octogenarian grandmother, to talk about? Plenty, as it turns out. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)
In this Thursday, April 26, 2012 photo, Dr. Ruth Westheimer signs a copy of her book for a fan at the National Council of Jewish Women in New York. In 1980, Westheimer broke into late-night radio with "Sexually Speaking," launching a career as confider-in-chief. The voice that Westheimer found on radio, and in the books and television shows that followed, pushed the boundaries of popular culture, declaring it not just safe, but healthy, for people to speak explicitly about their sex lives. A generation after the country embraced the Ruthian ethic of sexual honesty and moved on, what's left for Dr. Ruth, now an octogenarian grandmother, to talk about? Plenty, as it turns out. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)

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