BAM's Blog

NewsOK | BLOGS

Photos and interviews: New traveling exhibit "The Science of Rock 'n' Roll" rocks Science Museum Oklahoma

by Brandy McDonnell Published: February 7, 2014
Advertisement
;
The new traveling exhibit "The Science of Rock 'n' Roll," now on view at Science Museum Oklahoma, hands-on, interactive exhibition that tries to tell the story of rock 'n' roll through the lens of science and technology. Photo by Paul Hellstern, The Oklahoman.
The new traveling exhibit "The Science of Rock 'n' Roll," now on view at Science Museum Oklahoma, hands-on, interactive exhibition that tries to tell the story of rock 'n' roll through the lens of science and technology. Photo by Paul Hellstern, The Oklahoman.
Project Manager Tom Ford demonstrates one of the interactive guitar stations that is part of the new traveling exhibit "The Science of Rock 'm' Roll" at Science Museum Oklahoma in Oklahoma City, OK, on Monday, February 3, 2014, Photo by Paul Hellstern, The Oklahoman
Project Manager Tom Ford demonstrates one of the interactive guitar stations that is part of the new traveling exhibit "The Science of Rock 'm' Roll" at Science Museum Oklahoma in Oklahoma City, OK, on Monday, February 3, 2014, Photo by Paul Hellstern, The Oklahoman

A version of this story appears in Friday’s Weekend Life section of The Oklahoman.

‘The Science of Rock ‘n’ Roll’ rocks Science Museum Oklahoma
The new traveling exhibition features hands-on elements such as vocal booths, instrument stations and Reactables.

New Wave one-hit wonder Thomas Dolby was blinded by science back in 1982, but a new traveling exhibit at Science Museum Oklahoma eagerly peers into “The Science of Rock ‘n’ Roll.”

While the playfully tuneful exhibition pays due homage to the Beatles, Blondie and the Rolling Stones, it favors framing the development of modern music through technological milestones like eight-track tapes, compact discs and iPods.

“Basically, the whole idea of the show was to try and tell the story of how we’ve gone from wax cylinders back in the early 19th century to now you literally have millions of songs in your pocket,” said Bryan J. Reinblatt, managing director Elevation Productions, which produces exhibitions for museums and science centers.

“It’s a combination of a lot of things, whether it be some amazing innovations, some breakthroughs in technology, sometimes accidents. The modern-day fuzz pedal, for example, that every artist will use – sometimes dozens of them on stage – was invented because a couple of guys in a band were mad at each other; he threw a screwdriver at him in the tour van, broke his speaker column and it just ended up with this sort of fuzzy kind of sound. And that became the birth of the fuzz pedal.”

The composition stations inside "The Science of Rock 'n' Roll" exhibit are actually the Reactables electronic interfaces recording artists like Bjork sometimes play onstage. By placing blocks called tangibles on the table's interactive screen and interfacing with the display, aspiring composers can manipulate rhythms and riffs, hooks and harmonies to create their own songs. Photo by Paul Hellstern, The Oklahoman
The composition stations inside "The Science of Rock 'n' Roll" exhibit are actually the Reactables electronic interfaces recording artists like Bjork sometimes play onstage. By placing blocks called tangibles on the table's interactive screen and interfacing with the display, aspiring composers can manipulate rhythms and riffs, hooks and harmonies to create their own songs. Photo by Paul Hellstern, The Oklahoman
Scott Henderson, Director of Satellite Galleries, touches up the paint on the outside of one of the composition stations inside the new traveling exhibit "The Science of Rock 'n' Roll" at Science Museum Oklahoma in Oklahoma City, OK, on Monday, February 3, 2014, Photo by Paul Hellstern, The Oklahoman
Scott Henderson, Director of Satellite Galleries, touches up the paint on the outside of one of the composition stations inside the new traveling exhibit "The Science of Rock 'n' Roll" at Science Museum Oklahoma in Oklahoma City, OK, on Monday, February 3, 2014, Photo by Paul Hellstern, The Oklahoman

Not just history

While interview totems allow visitors to hear Canadian DJ Red Robinson’s interviews with the likes of the Beatles, Ray Davies and Elvis, “decade pods” showcase the bands, fun facts and music delivery systems of each 10-year period from the 1950s to today.

“What’s really, really cool is when Mom and Dad take their young ones through and they’ve never seen a tape deck, they’ve never seen a CD, they’ve never seen an eight-track,” Reinblatt said.

“We go right into the new century with file sharing. … I think last year, record companies saw an uptick in sales for the first time in 15 years, mainly because of illegal downloading and file sharing. So all that technology, how did that impact rock ‘n’ roll music? You know, it’s a weird time if you’re an artist: easiest time in the world to make music – to make great-sounding music – to distribute that music around the world, but the most difficult time to get noticed. You get lost in this white noise of hundreds of thousands of bands out there.”

While album covers and band T-shirts are tucked into the glass cases, Reinblatt said the exhibit goes well beyond the usual displays of mementoes.

“This is not really about memorabilia that you might find at the Hard Rock Café or the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. This is a hands-on, interactive exhibition that tries to tell the story of rock ‘n’ roll through the lens of science and technology,” he said, adding the Experience Music Project in Seattle was another place the production team visited for inspiration.

“They’ve got some great memorabilia, some amazing stuff, but everyone ultimately wants to go to their jam room to play instruments. Everyone’s attracted to the hands-on stuff.”

Among the 10,250 square feet of rock ‘n’ roll in the exhibit are stations where people can actually try their hand at electric guitars, keyboards and drums.

“Without a doubt, our most popular exhibition is the drums. This goes back to our caveman days I’m convinced,” Reinblatt said with a grin.

Aspiring singers can step into vocal booths and wail away, while spectators (including parents and pals) can peer through portholes or bunch a button to listen in, he said.

The exhibit’s composition stations are actually the Reactables electronic musicians like Bjork sometimes play onstage. By placing blocks called tangibles on the table’s interactive screen and interfacing with the display, aspiring composers can manipulate rhythms and riffs, hooks and harmonies to create their own songs.

“What ends up happening is very fun and collaborative,” Reinblatt said. “You’ll often see six people get around that table and they don’t know each other, and they’re trying this and creating a song together.” Or they’re crowding around and listening to people play guitar. It’s really, really, really cool to see how much fun people have.”

Visitors can get an “All Access Backstage Pass” they can use to record their musical experiences and download them from scienceofrock.com.

“Of course, in this day and age, it doesn’t happen if it’s not recorded, right?” Reinblatt said with a smile.

Visitors can learn how guitars make music in the interactive traveling exhibit "The Science of Rock 'n' Roll," on view at Science Museum Oklahoma. Photo by Paul Hellstern, The Oklahoman
Visitors can learn how guitars make music in the interactive traveling exhibit "The Science of Rock 'n' Roll," on view at Science Museum Oklahoma. Photo by Paul Hellstern, The Oklahoman
Fans can trace the development of modern music through the bands and technology of the different decades as part of the new traveling exhibit "The Science of Rock 'n' Roll" at Science Museum Oklahoma. Photo by Paul Hellstern, The Oklahoman
Fans can trace the development of modern music through the bands and technology of the different decades as part of the new traveling exhibit "The Science of Rock 'n' Roll" at Science Museum Oklahoma. Photo by Paul Hellstern, The Oklahoman
Beatles memorabilia and various music players are included in the "decade pods" inside "The Science of Rock 'n' Roll" exhibit, now on view at Science Museum Oklahoma. Photo by Paul Hellstern, The Oklahoman
Beatles memorabilia and various music players are included in the "decade pods" inside "The Science of Rock 'n' Roll" exhibit, now on view at Science Museum Oklahoma. Photo by Paul Hellstern, The Oklahoman

Science and art

The exhibit also features a Mono vs. Dolby stereo room, mixing stations where fans can tinker with David Bowie’s epic “Space Oddity” and a rock concert video room with a 20-foot video wall, light show and crowd effects.

“It relates science and technology to the arts, and we are regularly looking for those kinds of exhibits that … help people make that connection,” said Science Museum Oklahoma President and CEO Don Otto.

“It taps into popular culture and it begins to get people’s attention about the connection to science that most people listening to music probably don’t really think about. That’s what appealed to us.”

Science Museum Oklahoma, which is the exhibit’s third U.S. stop, will tap “The Science of Rock ‘n’ Roll” through May 3. Otto said the museum hopes to host local band concerts in conjunction with the show.

“We think people will see a lot of Oklahoma influence in this exhibit … and a lot of these things have influenced the Oklahoma music scene,” Otto said. “We’ve got such a rich musical community in Oklahoma.”

Project Manager Tom Ford demonstrates one of the interactive vocal booths that is part of the new traveling exhibit "The Science of Rock 'n' Roll" at Science Museum Oklahoma in Oklahoma City, OK, Monday, February 3, 2014, Photo by Paul Hellstern, The Oklahoman
Project Manager Tom Ford demonstrates one of the interactive vocal booths that is part of the new traveling exhibit "The Science of Rock 'n' Roll" at Science Museum Oklahoma in Oklahoma City, OK, Monday, February 3, 2014, Photo by Paul Hellstern, The Oklahoman

ON EXHIBIT

“The Science of Rock ‘n’ Roll”

When: Through May 3.

Where: Science Museum Oklahoma, 2100 NE 52.

Tickets: $17.95 for adults (ages 13-64) and $14.95 for children (ages 3-12) and seniors (65 and older). Includes general admission to the museum. A special rate is available for school groups.

Information: www.sciencemuseumok.com or http://scienceofrock.com.

A wall of reproductions of vintage concert posters leads into the rock concert video room inside the new traveling exhibit "The Science of Rock 'n' Roll" at Science Museum Oklahoma in Oklahoma City, OK, Monday, February 3, 2014, Photo by Paul Hellstern, The Oklahoman
A wall of reproductions of vintage concert posters leads into the rock concert video room inside the new traveling exhibit "The Science of Rock 'n' Roll" at Science Museum Oklahoma in Oklahoma City, OK, Monday, February 3, 2014, Photo by Paul Hellstern, The Oklahoman
A rock concert video room with a 20-foot video wall, light show and crowd effects is part of "The Science of Rock 'n' Roll" exhibit at Science Museum Oklahoma. Photo by Paul Hellstern, The Oklahoman
A rock concert video room with a 20-foot video wall, light show and crowd effects is part of "The Science of Rock 'n' Roll" exhibit at Science Museum Oklahoma. Photo by Paul Hellstern, The Oklahoman
Inside the interactive exhibit "The Science of Rock 'n' Roll," "interview totems" allow visitors to hear Canadian DJ Red Robinson's interviews with the likes of the Beatles, Ray Davies and Elvis. Photo by Paul Hellstern, The Oklahoman
Inside the interactive exhibit "The Science of Rock 'n' Roll," "interview totems" allow visitors to hear Canadian DJ Red Robinson's interviews with the likes of the Beatles, Ray Davies and Elvis. Photo by Paul Hellstern, The Oklahoman
Inside "The Science or Rock 'n' Roll" exhibit, "interview totems" allow visitors to hear Canadian DJ Red Robinson's interviews with superstars like The Beatles. Sunday marks the 50th anniversary of the Fab Four's debut on the "Ed Sullivan Show." Photo by Paul Hellstern, The Oklahoman
Inside "The Science or Rock 'n' Roll" exhibit, "interview totems" allow visitors to hear Canadian DJ Red Robinson's interviews with superstars like The Beatles. Sunday marks the 50th anniversary of the Fab Four's debut on the "Ed Sullivan Show." Photo by Paul Hellstern, The Oklahoman
A collection of guitars adorns a wall of the new traveling exhibit "The Science of Rock 'n' Roll" at Science Museum Oklahoma. Photo by Paul Hellstern, The Oklahoman
A collection of guitars adorns a wall of the new traveling exhibit "The Science of Rock 'n' Roll" at Science Museum Oklahoma. Photo by Paul Hellstern, The Oklahoman

-BAM

by Brandy McDonnell
Entertainment Reporter
Brandy McDonnell, also known by her initials BAM, writes stories and reviews on movies, music, the arts and other aspects of entertainment. She is NewsOK’s top blogger: Her 4-year-old entertainment news blog, BAM’s Blog, has notched more than 1...
+ show more


Trending Now


AROUND THE WEB

  1. 1
    11-year-old boy tackles unemployment, housing, and diversity in Ferguson
  2. 2
    Here Are The Most-Googled Brands In Each State
  3. 3
    Report: Minnesota Vikings do not foresee Adrian Peterson in their future
  4. 4
    'Maze Runner' finds way to box office victory
  5. 5
    The first games that show off iOS 8's graphics are available for download
+ show more