Plains oil shipments disrupting Amtrak trains

Published on NewsOK Modified: January 29, 2014 at 4:19 pm •  Published: January 29, 2014
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CHICAGO (AP) — A group that advocates for train and rail transit passengers says a massive increase in rail shipments of crude oil from the northern Plains is partly to blame for disruptions to an Amtrak route linking Chicago and the West Coast.

The National Association of Railroad Passengers wrote to U.S. Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx this week urging him to intervene.

Amtrak's Empire Builder service runs along a BNSF Railway route that has seen an increase in oil shipments from the Bakken region of North Dakota and Montana.

Winter weather has exacerbated several months of disruptions. Westbound Amtrak trains this week have had to bypass several stops stretching across much of North Dakota, forcing the railroad to use buses to get passengers to those destinations. Delays have reached up to 10 hours.

A sugar company based outside Fargo, N.D., is also complaining about disruptions on the BNSF line. American Crystal Sugar Co. officials said this week they're worried that a slowdown in rail service could cost the company millions of dollars if it continues to disrupt production. American Crystal Sugar said it plans to scale back on output at three of its plants because it's running out of storage space waiting for rail cars.

BNSF spokeswoman Amy McBeth said severe weather was to blame for the most recent impacts. To try to reduce congestion from increased freight volumes, she said the railroad invested more than $200 million in North Dakota last year and plans more improvements this year that will benefit all rail users.



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