Poll shows managing money is today’s 'birds and bees' talk

Tougher economic conditions have pushed teens to make money management a higher priority than in the past. Nearly 90 percent of teens plan to save more and 78 percent will spend less in the wake of the recessive economy.
BY BRIAN JACKSON, Junior Achievement of Oklahoma Published: April 14, 2011
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TULSA -- A new study from Junior Achievement and The Allstate Foundation shows that 81 percent of teenagers say the recession has motivated them to learn more about managing their money and parents are their No. 1 resource for financial planning, but less than half of teens say they have discussed money management with their family.

“Much like the ‘birds and bees’ talk from previous eras, money management has become the topic that today’s teenagers desperately need to learn from their parents,” said Belynda Clanton vice president of programs for Junior Achievement of Oklahoma.

“But, and also like the birds and bees, many of today’s parents may not feel up to the task of educating their children about money matters, so they hope their children learn what they need to know in other ways.”

Tougher economic conditions have pushed teens to make money management a higher priority than in the past. Nearly 90 percent of teens plan to save more and 78 percent will spend less in the wake of the recessive economy.

To help kick-start a family conversation about money management at home, Junior Achievement, in collaboration with The Allstate Foundation, recently launched a series of free online lessons that empower youth to own their future economic success. The online lessons, the first resource of its kind from Junior Achievement, engage kids in an online space to learn about money in a fun and entertaining way.

“It’s more important than ever to invest in America’s youth to ensure their personal financial well-being and the continued growth of the economy,” said Matt Winter, president and CEO, Allstate Financial. “The Allstate Foundation and Junior Achievement are reinventing the way our children learn how to weather a tough economy and manage their financial futures in the real world.”

Junior Achievement’s online and in-classroom curricula teach age-appropriate concepts around spending, sharing and saving money.



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