Practice of religion has some limits

Published: January 7, 2013
Advertisement
;

“For now, court passes on religious freedom” (Washington Examiner, Jan. 2) claims that it's not the place of the federal courts to “decide which tenets actually count.” Surely this doesn't mean that a business or person is exempt from federal laws based on any tenet of any religion. Since religion in America isn't state-mandated, it's easy to establish a religion and many mainstream bodies hold beliefs that would be destructive to our society.

For example, a Muslim business owner could earnestly believe that women shouldn't be in the workplace and refuse to hire one. Or a Baptist who earnestly believes that homosexuality is wrong could refuse to sell condoms to a gay person. And the Catholic majority of a company's stockholders could deny employee access to all birth control, not just abortifacients. What about somebody starting up the Church Of The Income Tax Free Society?

The judiciary's duties are to balance the rights of the few against the right of many, as well as a practice's value or detriment to society. The freedom to practice your religion isn't a license to do whatever you think God wants you to do.

Tim Walker, Piedmont



Trending Now


AROUND THE WEB

  1. 1
    Sex Valley: Tech's booming prostitution trade
  2. 2
    Colorado Is Consuming Way More Pot Than Anyone Ever Believed
  3. 3
    What Dan Gilbert said to LeBron James to get him to return to Cleveland
  4. 4
    Female Yahoo Exec Sued By a Female Employee for Sexual Harassment
  5. 5
    A company wants you to experiment on Facebook — by quitting
+ show more