President's budget would raise taxes on the wealthy and energy industry, expand tax credits for poor

Much of president’s budget for 2015 stands little chance on Capitol Hill, as it draws criticism from Republicans for not tackling entitlement programs.
by Chris Casteel Modified: March 4, 2014 at 8:03 pm •  Published: March 5, 2014
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President Barack Obama submitted a 2015 budget Tuesday that would raise taxes on wealthy individuals and oil and gas companies, while broadening tax credits for the poor and expanding access to preschool.

The budget blueprint sent to Capitol Hill proposes spending $56 billion more than the bipartisan budget agreement from December would allow, with about half going to the Defense Department and the rest spread out over various domestic initiatives.

The president proposed to pay for the $56 billion by capping the amount wealthy individuals can put into tax-preferred retirement savings accounts, cutting crop insurance subsidies to farmers and insurers and raising airline passenger fees.

Republican congressional leaders deemed the budget dead on arrival.

House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, said it was “perhaps his most irresponsible budget yet” and criticized the president for not offering ways to tame spending on entitlement programs like Social Security and Medicare, the biggest drivers of the federal budget.

Obama included a proposal in last year’s budget to pare cost-of-living increases for Social Security and other federal retirement programs; that was not part of this year’s budget submission, which relies heavily on tax hikes on the wealthy to reduce future deficits.

The president’s budget projects a deficit of $564 billion for the 2015 fiscal year and about $2.5 trillion in deficit spending from 2015 through 2019.

“As a country, we’ve got to make a decision if we’re going to protect tax breaks for the wealthiest Americans, or if we’re going to make smart investments necessary to create jobs and grow our economy, and expand opportunity for every American,” Obama said during a visit to an elementary school in Washington.


by Chris Casteel
Washington Bureau
Chris Casteel began working for The Oklahoman's Norman bureau in 1982 while a student at the University of Oklahoma. After covering the police beat, federal courts and the state Legislature in Oklahoma City, he moved to Washington in 1990, where...
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