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Prominent Oklahoma House members deem bill 'socialistic'

A workforce development bill that opponents called “socialistic” and “utterly ridiculous” was defeated Tuesday by the Oklahoma House of Representatives.
by Randy Ellis Modified: April 16, 2014 at 12:15 pm •  Published: April 15, 2014
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An Oklahoma workforce development bill that legislative opponents called “socialistic” and “utterly ridiculous” was defeated Tuesday by the state House of Representatives.

Backers of the bill said it was designed to entice companies to invest in their workers.

House author Elise Hall, R-Oklahoma City, served notice that she might bring Senate Bill 1639 back for another vote after it was defeated 39-49 on the House floor.

The bill, backed by state Senate leaders, had sailed through the Senate by a vote of 45-1. Senate President Pro Tem Brian Bingman and state Sen. John Ford, R-Bartlesville, authored the bill in that chamber.

The bill would offer rebates equal to 105 percent of the cost of tuition and materials to companies paying those costs on behalf of employees seeking licenses, certificates or degrees in certain jobs targeted as having high potential for growth and building wealth.

Money to pay the rebates would come from state income tax revenues.

Hall argued the program would pay for itself because trained employees would move into higher-paying jobs and their employers would hire new employees to fill their old slots. That would result in employees paying more taxes to the state, she said.

Many House members were skeptical.

“This bill seems to be on its face utterly ridiculous,” said state Rep. Mike Reynolds, R-Oklahoma City.

“When is enough, enough?” asked state Rep. David Dank, R-Oklahoma City. “Every day we’re giving away free money. ... I want to create jobs. I want every one of my neighbors, my relatives, your neighbors and your relatives to have a job, but we can’t do that if we keep giving away the farm.”

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by Randy Ellis
Investigative Reporter
For the past 30 years, staff writer Randy Ellis has exposed public corruption and government mismanagement in news articles. Ellis has investigated problems in Oklahoma's higher education institutions and wrote stories that ultimately led to two...
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