Propane shortage fuels anger, angst

In Oklahoma, about 400,000 customers rely on propane. Since early December, the price of a gallon of the fuel has rocketed from about $2 to nearly $5 at its peak in late January.
by Adam Kemp Modified: February 7, 2014 at 10:00 pm •  Published: February 8, 2014
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With the temperatures hovering just above single digits Thursday, Kyndal Looper wasn't about to let her daughter build a snowman.

“It's just too cold outside,” Looper, 31, told her daughter as she was tugging at her shirt asking to go play. “We are gonna stay inside and keep warm.”

Warmth at the Looper's comes courtesy of propane tank that sits in the side yard of the family's Edmond home. And despite a huge increase in the price of propane across the country, Looper and her family, unlike some others, still are relying on the fuel to keep them warm.

“Thankfully, our propane dealer saw the hikes coming and told us to fill up early,” she said. “We've been able to get by without paying an arm and a leg.”

About 5.5 million homes nationwide are heated with propane, mostly in rural areas, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

In Oklahoma, about 400,000 customers rely on propane.

Since early December, the price of a gallon of the fuel has rocketed from about $2 to nearly $5 at its peak in late January. The soaring prices prompted Gov. Mary Fallin to issue an executive order last week to help lower-income families who rely on propane pay to keep their homes warm. The order provides up to $3,600 in heating assistance per household on a first-come, first-served basis.

Meanwhile, governors of seven Midwestern states have joined in calling on the Obama administration to help increase the dwindling supplies, which industry officials attribute to the extremely cold winter weather and an especially wet harvest season when an unusual amount of propane was used to dry corn crops.

Angry customers

Cold customers are confronting propane dealers with hostility and accusing them of price gouging.

At American Propane near the Oklahoma City stockyards, owner Herb Hampton said he tries to explain to angry customers that the rising prices have been a mess for everybody and that his hands are tied.

Benchmark prices are set by large-volume dealers in Texas and Kansas, Hampton said. The cheapest supplies came out of Houston so many smaller dealers were traveling the southwest and waiting in 30-hour lines to stock up at the lowest price.

He sympathizes with his customers for their hardship.


by Adam Kemp
Enterprise Reporter
Adam Kemp is an enterprise reporter and videographer for the Oklahoman and Newsok.com. Kemp grew up in Oklahoma City before attending Oklahoma State University. Kemp has interned for the Oklahoman, the Oklahoma Gazette and covered Oklahoma State...
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