Proposed USDA rule provides hope for puppy mill dogs

BY MELANIE KAHN Published: July 20, 2012

When I met Brandy, a black-and-white Boston terrier, she leaned in close for a cuddle. Her glossy coat, smiling face and friendly nature were proof that she was in loving hands.

It wasn't always that way. Two years earlier, teams with the Humane Society of the United States helped to rescue Brandy, and nearly 100 other breeding dogs, from a Virginia puppy mill, which is a large-scale, inhumane commercial breeding facility.

Three-year-old Brandy was found sweltering in an outdoor enclosure with no water or food. She and two other dogs were in a pen littered with feces. Brandy was underweight, dehydrated and flea-infested. Jutting out from her eye was a red, inflamed growth resembling half of a peppermint candy. Except for her round, pregnant belly, she was skin and bones. After an emergency C-section, Brandy lost two pups. She then performed a rescue of her own, nursing two orphaned beagle puppies alongside her one surviving pup.

Sadly, Brandy's story of abuse and neglect isn't unique. Rescuers often find dozens — sometimes hundreds — of dogs like Brandy in puppy mills all over the country, when people put profit above animal welfare.

Now there is hope for puppy mill dogs, particularly those sold over the Internet by commercial breeders who've escaped regulation for years. The U.S. Department of Agriculture has proposed a rule that would hold large-scale breeders who sell dogs over the Internet accountable to basic humane standards for shelter, care and exercise.

Commercial breeders who sell to pet stores are required to be federally licensed and inspected and meet basic humane standards. But Internet sellers who market thousands of puppies a year directly to consumers are exempt, even though they may keep and breed just as many animals as those who sell to pet stores.