Prosecutors seek to stop work at World Cup stadium

Published on NewsOK Modified: December 15, 2013 at 2:06 pm •  Published: December 15, 2013
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SAO PAULO (AP) — Public prosecutors want to halt construction at the World Cup stadium where a man fell 115 feet to his death while working on a roofing structure in the jungle city of Manaus.

Prosecutors want the "immediate" interruption of work in all areas where laborers need to be high above the ground. They said work should only restart after constructors show that all safety measures are in place at the Arena da Amazonia, the stadium hosting four World Cup matches next June, including England vs. Italy and United States vs. Portugal.

It isn't clear when the request will be considered by a labor judge.

Work at the venue was interrupted after Saturday's death but was expected to resume on Sunday. It was the second death at Manaus' Arena da Amazonia this year and the third at a World Cup venue in less than a month.

A few hours after Saturday's death, another worker died of a heart attack while paving an area outside the venue in Manaus. Later in the day, a local union threatened to start a strike there on Monday to complain about inadequate conditions offered to laborers.

Two workers were killed when a crane collapsed on Nov. 27 as it was hoisting a 500-ton piece of roofing at the Sao Paulo stadium that will host the World Cup opener. Last year, a worker died at the construction site of the stadium in the nation's capital, Brasilia.

The first death at the Arena da Amazonia happened in March. Another worker died in April at the new Palmeiras stadium, which may be used for teams training in Sao Paulo.



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