Provocative Harpo Marx bio demands some heavy academic lifting

The 336-page paperback — packed with thumbnail photos — is essentially a wordy effort to analyze every move and gesture the voiceless Harpo Marx made on screen in 13 Marx Brothers comedies.
by Dennis King Modified: June 25, 2012 at 5:34 pm •  Published: June 26, 2012
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If you're the kind of reader who shies away from heavy-duty academic noodling and psychologically complex examinations of cinema icons, then the scholar, critic, essayist, novelist Wayne Koestenbaum's dense, abstract love letter to the most enigmatic silent comedian of the early talkies era is one to avoid.

But cinema buffs with a taste for quirky, exotic and highly personalized theorizing on pop culture will find a challenging, if occasionally daunting, read in “The Anatomy of Harpo Marx” (University of California Press, $29.95).

Koestenbuam's lavish, 336-page paperback — packed with thumbnail photos — is essentially a wordy effort to analyze every move the voiceless Harpo Marx made on screen in 13 Marx Brothers comedies. To some, the author's minute attention to obscure detail and a decidedly peculiar psychosexual focus on Harpo's physical attributes might seem more than a little obsessive, odd and off-putting.

Readers with patience to wade through Koestenbaum's far-flung literary and cultural asides (ranging from Dostoevsky to Emily Dickinson and beyond) or his naked tangents on personal childhood memories (including, literally, musing on the shape of his own navel), the biography delivers some pure moments of zestful literary acrobatics.

Ranging nonchronologically through 13 Marx Brothers movies — from 1929's “The Cocoanuts” to 1950's “Love Happy” — the author takes a scattershot approach to assessing the genius of Harpo's work and his prowess as a pioneering physical comedian. Deeply interspersed with this academic analysis are frequent forays into the author's own psyche (having much to do with his sexual preferences, his Jewishness, his odd family history and his endless penchant for wordplay).

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by Dennis King
Movie Critic (Contributor)
King spent 31 years as an ink-stained wretch working for newspapers in Seminole, Ada, Oklahoma City and Tulsa. He holds a B.A. degree in English from the University of Central Oklahoma and for 16 years served as an adjunct instructor in journalism...
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