Public not sure who to blame for high gasoline prices

Across the U.S., people are irritated by record-high fuel prices that have soared above $4 a gallon in some states and could top $5 by summer. The cost is becoming a political issue as the presidential campaign kicks into high gear.
By JOHN ROGERS Published: March 23, 2012
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Families canceling vacations. Fishermen watching their profits burn up along with their boats' gasoline. Drivers buying only a few gallons of gas at a time because they can't afford to fill the tank.

From all corners of the country, Americans are irritated these days by record-high fuel prices that have soared above $4 a gallon in some states and could top $5 by summer. And the cost is becoming a political issue just as the presidential campaign kicks into high gear.

Some blame President Barack Obama. Some just cite “the government,” while others believe it's the work of big, greedy oil companies.

No matter who is responsible, almost everyone seems to want the government to do something, even if people aren't sure what, exactly, it should or can do.

A Gallup poll this month found 85 percent of U.S. adults believe the president and Congress “should take immediate actions to try to control the rising price of gas.”

An Associated Press-GfK poll last month showed 71 percent believe gas prices are a “very” or “extremely” important matter.

Chris Kaufman, who spends $120 a week on gas to travel the 60 miles between his two jobs, at the University of South Dakota in Sioux Falls and at a hotel in Vermillion, S.D., blames the price spike on threats from Iran to cut off oil shipments through the Strait of Hormuz.

“I think the candidates running for president need to take a good hard look at that and determine what their foreign policy is going to be for countries that threaten to do that,” he said. “It's going to affect every single citizen in the United States.”

Still, he believes the president has little control over gas prices, adding that it is commodities traders who really dictate prices.

Trucker Cory Nissen, of Ruther Glen, Va., agrees.

“The president is nothing but a fall guy,” Nissen said as he took a break from his rig at a stop in Wilton, N.Y., earlier this week.

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